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Dr. Rudolf Jaenisch's Lab

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Contact Information:

Rudolf Jaenisch, M.D.
Founding Member, Whitehead Institute
Professor of Biology. Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Biology

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Whitehead Institute
Nine Cambridge Center
Cambridge, MA
02142-1479

Assistant: Gerry Kemske
phone: 617.258.5189
kemske@wi.mit.edu

 

Celebrating 10 Years of hESC Cell Lines

Ten years ago this November, a paper was published that led to an explosion in the field of stem cell research. In November 1998, Dr. James Thomson’s laboratory reported the first derivation of
human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines from human blastocysts (Science 1998;282:1145–1147).

To celebrate this landmark discovery, and to look forward to the future of stem cell research, Stem Cells has begun an interview series titled “Celebrating 10 Years of hESC Cell Lines”. Over the next several months, STEM CELLS will present interviews reflecting on the lives and achievements of some of the premiere scientists in the field of stem cells and Regenerative Medicine. The series continues here with “An Interview with Rudolf Jaenisch”.

Read the Introductory Editorial to this series from Dr. Miodrag Stojkovic, Co-Editor of Stem Cells, in the November issue of STEM CELLS.

Read our interview with Dr. Jaenisch in the November issue of STEM CELLS.

Read additional excerpts from our interview with Dr. Jaenisch available only on the Stem Cells Portal

Join our Discussion Forum - "With the advent of iPS cells, is generating ESCs from embryos still important?"

Lab Feature

Overview of the Jaenisch Lab:
“What makes a given cell a given cell—what makes a liver cell a liver cell versus a brain cell versus an embryonic cell?” asks Rudolf Jaenisch. “We want to understand this in molecular terms, and we are using this information to convert one cell type into another.”
Jaenisch, a Whitehead Founding Member, focuses on understanding epigenetic regulation of gene expression (the biological mechanisms that affect how genetic information is converted into cell structures but that don’t alter the genes in the process). Most recently, this work has led to major advances in our understanding of embryonic stem cells and “induced pluripotent stem” (IPS) cells, which appear identical to embryonic stem cells but can be created from adult cells without using an egg.

Research in the Jaenisch Lab

Publications (from PubMed)

Selected Achievements

Video – Dr. Jaenisch Discusses “Creating iPS cells using the cancer gene c-Myc”
(From the Whitehead Institute)

Video – Dr. Jaenisch discusses “Making iPS cells from B cells”
(From the Whitehead Institute News Archives)

Video – Dr. Jaenisch Discusses “ Using iPS derived nerve cells in a Parkinson’s disease model”
(From the Whitehead Institute News Archives)

Article: Dr. Jaenisch discusses : “New technique produces genetically identical stem cells”
(From the Whitehead Institute News Archives)

The Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

MIT – Department of Biology

Jaensich Lab page at The Whitehead Institute

Jaensich Lab page at Massachusetts Institute of Techology