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Highlights of current exciting developments, ranging from research papers to court decisions to industry regulations

August 8, 2017

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Past Buzz

August 1,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Stem Cells for Corneal Wound Healing, Reprogramming Leukemic Cells, Marketing of High-Cost Regenerative Medicine, and Predicting Effects of MSCs on SLE!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Reviewing Stem Cells for Corneal Wound Healing

Wound healing in the cornea in response to injury or surgery represents a complex process governed by various types of stem cells. A recent review article in STEM CELLS from the lab of Alexander V. Ljubimov (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, USA) now presents, for the first time, the available evidence on stem cell participation in corneal wound healing. Furthermore, Saghizadeh et al. report on significant studies regarding the generation of corneal stem cells from pluripotent stem cells (among notable other cell sources) and their applicability to wound healing.

Tales from Reprograming Leukemic Cells to Pluripotency

A brief report from the laboratory of Mickie Bhatia (McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) tells of his team’s recent efforts in the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from leukemic cells as a modeling tool. In a STEM CELLS brief report,Lee et al. reveal that reprogramming in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells is a rare event that only occurs in those cells without genomic aberrations. Therefore, leukemic cells may suffer from an inherent “blockage” that prevents the attainment of the pluripotent state.

How to Plan Ahead in the Marketing of High Cost Regenerative Medicine

A review from the lab of Richard T. Maziarz (Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA), published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine brings us something different this week. In their words, “The development of cellular therapies faces a series of regulatory obstacles. Often overlooked will be barriers to utilization based upon reimbursement issues, practice guidelines, and payer contract restrictions. The authors provide guidance for early planning of reimbursement strategies to be performed by the cellular therapy biotechnology industry to assure successful launches within the U.S. multi-payer as well as the European Union members single-payer systems.” Sounds like a fascinating read!

Predicting the Effect of MSC Treatment in SLE Patients

A new study from the lab of Lingyun Sun (Nanjing University Medical School, China) aimed to identify possible serum markers to predict the therapeutic effect of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, Wang et al. report that high levels of IFN-γ indicated a good clinical response to MSCs transplantation when followed-up for one year.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

July 28,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – pNSC Brain Repair, Pluripotent stem cell‐derived Osteoblasts, Chemokine Treatment for ISD, and Adverse Events in Adipose-Derived Cell Therapy!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Primitive Neural Stem Cells Repair the Mouse Brain

Adult mouse primitive neural stem cells (pNSCs) derived from the forebrain subependymal zone bordering the lateral ventricles usually reside in a very slow-cycling state; however, researchers from the lab of Rachel L. Reeve (University of Toronto, Canada) hypothesized that GFAP-OCT4+ pNSCs could play a key role in brain repair. Their new STEM CELLS study now demonstrates that pNSCs proliferate and contribute to the replacement of definitive NSCs (developmentally downstream of pNSCs) following cytosine β-d-arabinofuranoside ablation. Could pNSCs represent an excellent source of cells for cell-based regenerative therapies in humans?

Pluripotent stem cell‐derived Osteoblasts Get the Job Done!

Osteoblasts are a crucial cell type, given that they support hematopoiesis in the bone marrow and maintain healthy bone. Now, researchers from the lab of Joy Y. Wu (Stanford University School of Medicine, USA) have assessed whether pluripotent stem cells can rescue aberrant skeletal development and bone marrow hematopoiesis in vivo. In their new STEM CELLS study, Chubb et al. describe two novel complementation assays, which demonstrate that induced pluripotent stem cell‐derived osteoblasts can compensate for the loss of osteoblast lineage cells in transgenic mice to form mineralized bone and bone marrow hematopoietic niche in vivo.

 

Chemokine vs. Stem Cells: Which is best for Urinary Sphincter Deficiency Treatment?

Intrinsic urinary sphincter deficiency (ISD) treatment normally comprises skeletal muscle precursor cell (skMPC) therapy; however, results have proved disappointing. A new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article from the lab of J. Koudy Williams (Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) now compares the safety and efficacy of the cell homing chemokine CXCL12 versus skMPCs in a rat model of ISD. William et al. demonstrate that CXCL12 treatment can restore sphincter muscle content with little clinical or tissue pathology in the short term. Therefore, treatment with a chemical that stimulates the body to heal itself may represent a novel ISD treatment strategy.

Reviewing Reported Adverse Events in Adipose-Derived Cell Therapy

A new review article from the lab of Navid Mohamadpour Toyserkani (Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark) aims to bring us all up to date with adverse reactions associated with adipose-derived cell therapy with a special focus on the risk of thromboembolic, immunological, and oncological safety concerns. Toyserkani et al. suggest that while adipose-derived cell therapy has a favorable safety profile, improvements to safety assessment are required to fully appreciate all adverse events moving forward. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for a great read!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

July 20,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – Chemoresistance in CSCs, MSC-IL6 and CSC Formation, Exosomal ncRNA Showdown in PSC-CMs, and the Therapeutic How-to Guide for EVs!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

CSCs Acquire Chemoresistance through FBXW7 and c-Myc

Using a previously established colorectal cancer stem cell model, the team of Takatsugu Ishimoto (Kumamoto University, Japan) has recently identified a potential means to inhibit CSC-mediated resistance to anticancer agents. Their new STEM CELLS study indicates that overexpression of FBXW7 in CSCs mediates the loss of c-Myc expression and reduces sensitivity to anticancer agents. Therefore, Izumi et al. suggest that “inhibition of FBXW7-upregulation in CSCs after chemotherapy may enhance response to anticancer agents and may be an effective strategy to eliminate colorectal CSCs.”

MSC-IL6 Promotes CSC-like Transformation through EMT

A new study from the labs of Anh D. Le and Qunzhou Zhang (University of Pennsylvania, USA) has investigated cancer stem cell (CSC)-like transformation in benign epithelial tumors, specifically solid/multicystic follicular ameloblastoma (AM). Jiang et al. now demonstrate that Interleukin-6 (IL6) secreted from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) promotes a CSC-like transformation by inducing an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in epithelial cells via STAT3 and ERK1/2-mediated signaling pathways. See STEM CELLS now for all the details.

ESC-CMs vs. iPSC-CMs: The Exosome ncRNA Showdown for MI

The labs of Joseph C. Wu or Sang-Ging Ong (Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, United States) bring a scientific showdown to STEM CELLS in the form of a comparison human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs) and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) for cardiac regenerative therapy. Lee et al. report that an identical repertoire of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs play a role in improved cardiac function following iPSC- and ESC-CM transplantation. For all the details, see STEM CELLS now!

Extracellular Vesicles: The How-To Guide for Therapeutic Use

A report published recently in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine reads like a veritable “How-to Guide” for the therapeutic use of extracellular vesicles (EVs). This new article provides details on the recent workshop convened by the members of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles and the Society for Clinical Research and Translation of Extracellular Vesicles (Singapore) to discuss opportunities/challenges associated with the development of EV-based therapeutics at both preclinical and clinical levels. Head on over to this article from Eva Rohde (Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria) and Sai Kiang Lim (A*STAR, Singapore) to see how the Workshop’s suggestions may enhance the development of best-practice models for EV therapies now!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

July 14,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Acetylated STAT3 and Cardiogenesis, Smoking-related effects on MSCs, Japanese Views on Chimeric Embryo Research, and Changing the Name of MSCs: A Response!

A roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond from the Stem Cells Portal!

Human Cardiogenesis Control by Acetylated STAT3

A new study from the labs of Ashish Mehta and Winston Shim (National Heart Research Institute Singapore) has recently determined a new factor that regulates the production of cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). Specifically, Mehta et al. discovered that the acetylated form of STAT3α supported cardiogenesis following caspase-3 mediated cleavage to generate a novel STAT3ζ fragment that permitted enhanced signaling of the ErbB4-p38γ cascade. See STEM CELLS now for all the details.

Reviewing the Effects and Implications of Smoking on MSCs

A new review from the lab of Herman S. Cheung (Miami VA Medical Center, Florida, USA) hopes to provide a summary of current data regarding the damaging nature of cigarette smoke or nicotine on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) populations. Greenberg et al. hope that this may highlight the use of smoking as an exclusion criterion when designing future stem cell-based trials and therapies that rely on the regenerative capacities of “healthy” stem cells. Get on over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now to read all about it!

How the Japanese View Human–Animal Chimeric Embryo Research

A recent “Letter to the Editor” from the group of Tsutomu Sawai (Kyoto University, Japan) has brought us the results of a Japan-wide survey on human–animal chimeric embryos following the publication of similar data from an American point of view. Overall, Sawai et al. indicate a high level of support for this types of research (81.0% of the public and 92.4% of researchers) although both the general public and researchers did have concerns regarding contributions of human cells to the brain and sperm/eggs. For more details, see STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now!

Responding to “Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Time to Change the Name!”

The lab of Daniel B.F. Saris (University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands) responded recently to a Perspective piece in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine by Arnold I. Caplan titled “Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Time to Change the Name!”. De Windt et al. support the claims made in the Perspective by suggesting that “there is sufficient evidence to stop calling MSCs stem cells”. However, the team also pose further interesting questions; dead on over to this Response article to dive into the discussion!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

July 11,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - CAMKK1 and Cardiac Repair, Stem Cell Educator Therapy, Engineered Biosphincters, and Mapping Megakaryocytes!

A roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond brought to you by the Stem Cells Portal!

CAMKK1 Improves MSC-mediated Cardiac Repair

Factors secreted by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great promise in the treatment of many diseases and disorders, including ischemic cardiomyopathy. Recent work from the lab of Maritza E. Mayorga (Northeast Ohio Medical University, USA) sought to discover MSC-secreted factors that improve cardiac function following the downregulation of the Dab2 TGFβ1 receptor adaptor protein. The lab’s new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article suggests that the protein kinase calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-1 (CAMKK1) protein is of fundamental importance.

 

Stem Cell Educator Therapy for Diabetes: 4-year follow-up

Stem cell educator (SCE) therapy for diabetes relies on treatment with autologous blood immune cells exposed to cord blood stem cells. The lab of Yong Zhao (Hackensack University Medical Center, New Jersey, USA) has recently reported on their 4-year follow-up studies in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. Zhao et al. now suggest that SCE therapy is safe and effective and functions by altering the mitochondria released by platelets, which displayed immune tolerance-, embryonic stem cell-, and islet β-cell-associated markers, leading to the improvement of islet β-cell functions.

 

Engineered Biosphincters for Passive Fecal Incontinence

A recent study from the lab of Khalil N. Bitar (Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Winston-Salem, USA) has assessed engineered autologous internal anal sphincter (IAS) biosphincters for the treatment of passive fecal incontinence in a rabbit model. Encouragingly, their new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study now suggests that this strategy is safe and effective and Bohl et al. hope to explore a human-centric strategy with patient's cells to engineer a new sphincter to help restore continence.

Mapping the Path taken from HSPCs to Megakaryocytes

A new review article from the lab of Hidekazu Nishikii (University of Tsukuba, Japan) has summarized recent findings related to megakaryocytes differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the hope of creating a map of the route taken! Furthermore, this new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine hopes to discuss the potential future directions in this exciting research area. Sounds like a great read!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

June 27,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Regenerating the Diabetic Heart, Tissue Repair with Stem Cell-EVs, ESC-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons, and Trialing ADRCs for Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema!

A roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond brought to you by the Stem Cells Portal!

Regenerating the Diabetic Heart: Reviewing the Challenges

Stem cell treatments to improve cardiac function are impaired in diabetic patients due to the progressive decline in the regenerative capacity of the stem cells themselves. Now, a new article from the labs of Rajesh Katare and Regis R Lamberts (University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand) aims to summarize the molecular alterations that reduce diabetic cardiac stem cell function to highlight possible strategies to improve this treatment option. See STEM CELLS for all the details!

The Promise of Tissue Repair with Stem Cell-EVs

The potent therapeutic activity of many stem cells is thought to derive from paracrine actions rather than the engraftment and differentiation at the injured sites. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent one such paracrine-acting factor, and the lab of Yang Wang (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China) has recently published a report the therapeutic potential of stem cell-derived EVs in promoting tissue repair and regeneration. This new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article mainly focuses on cutaneous wound healing, bone regeneration, hindlimb ischemia, and vascular injury repair.

Finding the Right Age for ESC-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons

Human embryonic stem cells-derived midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons have potential as an exciting treatment option for Parkinson's disease (PD). The labs of Eng King Tan (National Neuroscience Institute), Steve Oh (A*STAR), and Li Zeng (National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore) sought to discover the optimal differentiation stage of mDA cells for PD therapy in their recent STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article. Interestingly, this study highlighted the usefulness of immature DA neurons (25 days) and DA neurons (35 days differentiation), but not DA progenitors (16 days). See the original study for all the fine print!

TrialingADRCs for Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema

A new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine report provides us all the details on a new “First in Human Pilot Study” of adipose-derived stromal cells, rich in stem/progenitor cells, for the treatment of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). The lab of Jens Ahm Sørensen (Odense University, Denmark) demonstrates that autologous adipose-derived stromal cells alleviate symptoms and reduce dependence on other treatment options with no noteworthy adverse events. The authors hope that randomized clinical trials will confirm these positive results.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

June 23,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – TEC and hPSCs, Hemodynamic Vascular Cell induction, Ex vivo-generated Erythrocytes, and MSC Treatment for Felines!

A roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond brought to you by the Stem Cells Portal

TEC- and FGF2-mediated Control of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

A recent study from the labs of Petr Dvořák and Michaela Bosáková (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic) has described the role of the TEC kinase (tyrosine kinase expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma) in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) self-renewal and differentiation. Vanova et al. describe how TEC mediates FGF2 secretion to boost hPSC self-renewal, while a lack of TEC promotes differentiation into the neuroectodermal lineage and inhibits the development of cardiac mesoderm. See STEM CELLS now for all the fine print!

Hemodynamic Exposure Induces Vascular Cell Phenotypes

Vascular endothelial (iECs) and smooth muscle cells (iSMCs) derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) often display signs of immaturity, making them less suitable for therapeutic application. To counteract this lack of adequate development, the lab of Brian R. Wamhoff (HemoShear Therapeutics, LLC, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA) asked whether hemodynamic exposure could help to mature iECs and iSMCs. In their new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study, the team now demonstrate that hemodynamic exposure facilitated the maturation of iPSC-derived cells and permitted a high degree of similarity to primary cells in their responses to pathological stimuli associated with vascular diseases.

Ex vivo-generated Erythrocytes from Cord Blood – The Blood Source of the Future?

The ex vivo generation of red blood cells (or erythrocytes) from various cellular sources may represent an exciting means to generate large amounts of blood for transfusion purposes. The lab of Yongping Jiang (Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College) recently assessed erythrocyte production from cord blood (CB) CD34+ cells employing a bottle turning device culture system. Their new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study suggests that 5 million CD34+ cells may produce enough erythrocytes for 500 blood transfusion units, while xenotransfusion studies in non-human primates with hemorrhagic anemia confirmed the safety and efficiency of this approach!

 

MSC Treatment for Feline Oral Mucosal Inflammatory Disease

While the immunomodulatory functions of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have made them an exciting treatment options for immune-mediated inflammatory disorders in humans, the team of Boaz Arzi (UC Davis, USA) also hope to apply these useful cells in our furry feline friends! In detail, Arzi et al. assessed the ability of fresh allogeneic adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) to treat the chronic oral mucosal inflammatory disease feline chronic gingivostomatitis (FCGS). For all the details on their successful findings, head over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

June 19,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – New TNBC Model, Aberrant Stem Cell Divisions, First-in-Man Stem Cell Trial, and Revascularization with UCBs!

A roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond brought to you by the Stem Cells Portal

New TNBC Model Used to Delineate Cancer-Specific Signaling and Functions

Researchers from the lab of Henrik J. Ditzel (University of Southern Denmark) recently set out to discover how to target breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) by comparing two different sets of isogenic cells (one tumor initiating and one non-tumor initiating) derived from a triple-negative breast cancer cell line. Interestingly, this new STEM CELLS study indicates that cells that initiate tumors down-regulate their apoptotic pathway and display differential NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Can further analyses of these pathways provide druggable targets?

Aberrant Stem Cell Division found in Psoriasis

Taking their influence from cancer studies, researchers from the lab of Ruby Ghadially (UCSF, USA) have recently reported on their studies into the dysregulation of asymmetric stem cell divisions (ACDs) and symmetric cell divisions (SCDs) in the benign hyperproliferation of psoriasis. Their new STEM CELLS study suggests that IL7A, a target for inhibition for the treatment of psoriasis, increased asymmetric stem cell divisions associated with psoriasis. The authors note that this study highlights an important link between the immune system and skin proliferation.

First-in-Man Stem Cell Trial for Articular Cartilage Repair

Trophic support for regeneration by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represents an important concept in many regenerative therapies. The lab of Daniel B.F. Saris (University Medical Center Utrecht, Netherlands) sought to harness this supporting role in a recent trial aimed at articular cartilage repair in a one-stage cell transplantation. The results of this trial, published in STEM CELLS, suggest that this strategy is safe and efficacious and supports a role for MSCs as a stimulator of our body’s inherent reparative/regenerative powers.

AD-Overexpressing UCB Cells Boost Revascularization

Motivate by the scarcity of therapeutically relevant cells, researchers from the lab of David A. Hess (Western University, Ontario, Canada) sought to ex vivo expand umbilical cord blood (UCB) progenitor cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase (AD) activity for the treatment of ischemic tissue-related disease. Their recent STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study describes just how Putman et al. achieved 18-fold expansion under defined, serum-free conditions without diminishing vascular regenerative functions. Wow!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

June 15,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – Hippo and Muscle Stem Cells, MSC Treatment of Neurodegeneration, Boosting Bone Repair, and Teratoma Treatment with EBRT!

A roundup of some of the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

How Hippo Handles Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells

The Hippo pathway members Yap and Taz control cell proliferation and regeneration, and the lab of Peter Zammit (King's College London, UK) recently sought to decipher their role in skeletal muscle stem cells. Sun et al. now demonstrate that both Taz and Yap promote myoblast proliferation, but following this, Taz switches roles and promotes myogenic differentiation. For all the interesting details, click your way to STEM CELLS now!

Reviewing MSC Treatment of Neurodegeneration

The many positive characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has made them a focal point for many cell-based therapies for a broad range of diseases and disorders. A new concise review from Rotem Volkman and Daniel Offen (Rabin Medical Center, Israel) now summarizes current developments in MSCs-based therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, the duo “examine the roles of central mechanisms suggested to mediate the beneficial effects of MSCs-based therapy and consider the augmentation of these mechanisms for superior clinical outcomes in rodent models of neurodegeneration as well as in clinical trials.” See STEM CELLS for a fascinating read!

Stem Cell Construct Boosts Natural Bone Repair Process

Endochondral ossification represents the body's natural bone repair process, and a recent study from the lab of Eben Alsberg (Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA) sought to boost this process employing human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells embedded with bioactive microparticles. Their new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article delineates how MSCs under the influence of TGF-β1 and BMP-2 enhanced healing of critical-sized calvarial bone defects within four weeks. Good news!

Treating Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Teratomas with EBRT

While the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to a milieu of therapeutically useful cell types holds great potential, there still exists a risk of differentiation resistant PSCs forming teratomas in patients. A recent study from Patricia K. Nguyen and Joseph C. Wu (Stanford University, California, USA) assessed the application of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to treat any tumors that way occur. In STEM CELLS, Lee et al. now suggest that this strategy can successfully eliminate teratoma and can be applied to reduce the reseeding potential of teratoma cells during serial transplantation experiments, and thereby increase the safety of stem cell-based therapies.

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

June 11,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Hhex-mediated Hematopoietic Regulation, MSC-mediated Neuroprotection, YY1 and CPCs, and Treating MPS1 with Liver-Directed hAECs!

A roundup of some of the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Hhex-mediated Hematopoietic Regulation via Cdkn2a

Recent studies from the lab of Matthew P. McCormack (Monash University, Australia) have analyzed the requirement for the hematopoietically expressed homeobox transcription factor (Hhex) gene in hematopoiesis. Now, their new study demonstrates that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) require Hhex to repress the Cdkn2a locus, which encodes the p16Ink4a and p19Arf tumor suppressors, to self-renew and respond to hematopoietic stress. See STEM CELLS now for all the details.

How MSCs mediate Neuroprotection in Parkinsonian Models

A new study from the lab of Phil Hyu Lee (Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea) describes how mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play a neuroprotective role in cell and animal models of Parkinsons Disease. Specifically, Oh et al. established that MSCs increase microtubule‐dependent axonal trafficking by inhibiting α‐synuclein‐induced tau phosphorylation and, therefore, suggest that pharmacological modulators of microtubule assembly or axonal transport may represent new therapeutic strategies. Head over to STEM CELLS now to read all the fine print.

All CPCs need is YY1!

The development of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) into cardiomyocytes requires the precise regulation of gene expression by various interacting factors. The lab of Sean M. Wu (Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USA) now reveals that overexpression of the YY1 transcription factor promotes proliferation but inhibits differentiation of CPCs via the modulation of the chromatin environment of the promoter of specific genes. Which genes? Head over to STEM CELLS to find out!

Treating MPS1 with Liver-Directed hAECs

Treatment options for the lysosomal storage disorder Mucopolysaccharidosis type 1 (MPS1) currently offer improved life expectancy, but often have no benefits for skeletal and neurological phenotypes. A new therapeutic option, from the lab of Toshio Miki (University of Southern California, USA), comprises the transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) into the liver to replace the enzyme missing in this disorder (α-l-iduronidase). Encouragingly, this treatment opportunity improved skeletal and neurological phenotypes and, therefore, may represent an exciting option for human patients. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine for all the details.

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!