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Highlights of current exciting developments, ranging from research papers to court decisions to industry regulations

February 17, 2017

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Past Buzz

February 13,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – Reprogramming Keratinocytes, MSC Immunosuppression Loss, Targeting Gastric CSCs, and SKP-mediated Corneal Regeneration!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Reprogramming Keratinocytes into Neural Crest Cells

Neural crest cells can give rise to a wide range of cells including melanocytes, craniofacial cartilage and bone, smooth muscle, peripheral and enteric neurons, and glia, and so may be of use for regenerative therapies. Now, in a new Stem Cells study, the lab of Stelios Andreadis (University at Buffalo, State University of New York, USA) has demonstrated how FGF2 and IGF1 signaling converts postnatal human epidermal keratinocytes, a common cell type, into neural crest cells that resemble those derived from human embryonic stem cells. Cool study!

MSCs: Losing their Immunosuppressive Potential via IDO

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) display immunosuppressive properties that make them of great interest in the treatment of a wide range of diseases/disorders. However, the in vitro expansion required to reach significant cell numbers leads to replicative senescence and a loss of function. But why?! The lab of Karin Tarte (INSERM U917, Rennes, France) now demonstrates that this loss of function correlates to decreased STAT-1-dependent indoleamine-2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) activity in response to inflammatory stimuli. This is due to specific degradation of IDO, although this new Stem Cells study suggests that proteasome inhibitor treatment may extend MSCs functionality.

Targeting Gastric Cancer Stem Cells with Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor IX

Eradicating cancer stem cells (CSCs) represents a promising strategy to battle many different types of cancer. Many have sought to find drugs that target CSCs, and such a strategy has allowed the lab of Ruben R. Plentz (Medical University Hospital, Tübingen, Germany) to construct a potential treatment for gastric cancers. Specifically, Barat et al demonstrated that gamma-secretase inhibitor IX (GSI) treatment targeted gastric CSCs and inhibited Notch and Wnt-beta-catenin signaling pathways. See Stem Cells Translational Medicine for all the fine print.

Regenerating the Cornea with SKPs

Corneal blindness is currently treated by allogenic corneal transplantation. This treatment option suffers from severe shortages of transplantable material, and so, the lab of Shigeto Shimmura (Keio University, Tokyo, Japan) sought to find out whether skin-derived precursors (SKPs), a neural crest cell type, could be of use. Excitingly, mouse and human SKPs differentiated into cells resembling corneal endothelium and mouse cells transplanted into a rabbit model of bullous keratopathy maintained corneal thickness and transparency. See this great new study over at Stem Cells Translational Medicine now!

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

February 8,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – Blood-brain-barrier Repair, Tumorigenicity links to Epigenetic Instability, MSCs in Lung Transplant Rejection, and Encapsulation of Pancreatic Islets!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Repairing the BBB with hBMEPCs

Many view the repair of damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) associated with ischemic stroke as an innovative target for neurorestoration. Researchers from the labs of Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis and Cesario V. Borlongan (University of South Florida, USA) asked whether transplantation of human bone marrow endothelial progenitor cells (hBMEPCs) may aid BBB repair in a recent Stem Cells study. Garbuzova-Davis et al  found that hBMEPC transplants engrafted well and abrogated stroke-altered vasculature and the study linked these improvements to the preservation of mitochondrial function and augmented pinocytosis, which may represent a new neurorestorative mechanism in BBB repair for stroke.

hiPSC-NS/PCs Tumorigenicity linked to Epigenetic Instability

One of the major problems associated with the transplantation of cells derived from human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) sources is the risk of tumorigenesis. A recent study from the laboratory of Hideyuki Okano (Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan) has employed genome-wide DNA methylation studies to understand how epigenetic alterations influence the tumorigenic nature of oncogenic human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (hiPSC-NS/PCs). Their new Stem Cells study suggests that unstable DNA methylation patterns contribute to tumorigenic risk and that their evaluation is important to cells entering into the clinical setting.

First in Man Study of MSCs in Lung Transplant Rejection

Stem Cells Translational Medicine brings us a first-in-man study concerning the treatment of chronic lung transplant rejection (or chronic lung allograft dysfunction [CLAD]) with intravenously delivered allogeneic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). This new research, from the group of Daniel C. Chambers (Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia), suggests that the “infusion of allogeneic bone marrow-derived MSCs is feasible and safe even in patients with advanced CLAD.” Great news!

Reviewing Encapsulation of Pancreatic Islets

The transplantation of human islets to cure for type 1 diabetes suffers from one major drawback; host immune rejection. To solve this problem, many have postulated the application of immune protective capsules that allow in oxygen and nutrients but not cells of the immune system. In a recent article in Stem Cells Translational Medicine, the lab of Berit L. Strand (NTNU, Trondheim, Norway) aim to provide us with a review of the current state of the art, strategies to overcome current problems, and new developments in technology. Sounds like a great read!

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

February 4,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – MSC Osteogenesis and RANKL, Calcineurin/NFAT signaling in iPSC Generation, Macrophage Polarization, and Targeting Epithelial Cancer Stem-like Cells!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

RANKL Mediates Osteogenic Differentiation of MSCs

The lab of Cristina Sobacchi (Humanitas Clinical and Research Institute, Rozzano, Italy) have recently reported on their exciting findings based on studies into autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO), a severe bone disease associated with impaired osteoclast function. In a new Stem Cells study, Schena et al report the identification of the RANKL cytokine as a critical molecule for mesenchymal stromal cell differentiation potential towards the osteogenic lineage in mice. The authors hope that this finding may be relevant for human patients.

 

Calcineurin/NFAT signaling Can Replace Sox2 for iPSC Generation

A new Stem Cells study from Sherif Khodeer and Takumi Era has unveiled previously unappreciated molecular mechanisms involved in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) reprogramming. Their findings indicate an early positive role for calcineurin/NFAT signaling in proper cell cycle division and mesenchymal–epithelial transition and a late negative role in the epigenetic repression of the Sox2 and Klf3 genes. A new level of control and a new target for cancer therapy?

Macrophage Polarization by MSC EVs

The lab of Roberta Tasso (IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genova, Italy) recently aimed to characterize extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by human adipose derived-mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in order to delineate how they modulated inflammation. In their new Stem Cells study, Lo Sicco et al discovered that MSC-EVs switched the polarization of bone marrow-derived macrophages from an M1 classically activated inflammatory state to an M2alternatively activated anti-inflammatory tissue-repair state. Could this represent a cell-free approach to reduce inflammation and promote regeneration?

Reviewing Epithelial Cancer Stem-like Cell Targeting Drugs

A great new concise review has made its way to Stem Cells from the lab of Abdolrahman S. Nateri (University of Nottingham, UK)related to drugs targeting cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) in epithelial cell-derived cancers. In their words - Increasing evidence suggests that cancer cell populations contain a small proportion of cells that display stem-like cell properties and which may be responsible for overall tumor maintenance. These CSCs appear to have unique tumor-initiating ability and innate survival mechanisms that allow them to resist cancer therapies, consequently promoting relapses. Selective targeting of CSCs may provide therapeutic benefit and several recent reports have indicated this may be possible.” Sounds like a great read!

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

January 31,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Skin Radiation Effects, Combining MSCs and ECFCs, RGC Survival, and Cochlear Hair Cell Regeneration!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Low Dose Radiation Effects on Skin

While huge efforts have gone into understanding the aftereffects of high dose radiation (HDR), we lack a similar level of data on responses to low dose radiation (LDR). To remedy this, the lab of Panagiota A. Sotiropoulou (Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium) has employed a mouse model to study the effects of LDR on skin epidermis. Their new Stem Cells study demonstrates that LDR causes DNA damage in sebaceous gland and bulge epidermal stem cells (SCs) and may represent a potent carcinogen in those predisposed to cancer.

Using MSCs to Boost Function of Transplanted ECFCs

Vasculogenesis supports the regeneration of injured tissues although the current lack of autologous and the immunogenicity of allogeneic endothelial progenitor remain problematic. To remedy this problem, researchers from the lab of Martina Seifert (Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany) have investigated co-transplantation of endothelial colony-forming progenitor cells (ECFCs) with mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) which display potent immunosuppressive capabilities. Their Stem Cells study now demonstrates that cotransplantation can lower the risk of ECFC rejection and so this strategy may be of use for therapeutic vasculogenesis.

Promoting RGC Survival with MSC Exosomes

Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) receive visual information from photoreceptors and their loss is a leading cause of blindness. Animal model systems have shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may protect and help RGC regeneration and so Ben Mead and Stanislav Tomarev set out to test one important paracrine factor excreted by MSCs: exosomes! Their new Stem Cells Translational Medicine study demonstrates that MSC-exosomes promoted survival and regeneration and that this improvement required the presence of microRNA. Could this represent a new cell-free treatment for RGC-associated visual loss?

Reviewing Cochlear Hair Cell Regeneration

The loss of cochlear hair cells leads to a loss in neurosensory hearing and currently lacks from treatment options given the lack of observed regeneration. Yet, some mouse studies suggest that early postnatal mice do retain progenitor-like cells which contribute to regeneration and so, Bénédicte Franco and Brigitte Malgrange bring us a new review concisely reporting the molecular mechanisms involved. Could new studies of said pathways lead to a regenerative therapy approach for adult hearing loss? Get over to Stem Cells and find out!

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

January 27,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – Safe hESC-derivatives, MSCs and Sepsis, NIC and β Cells, and iPSCs and Precision Medicine!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Safety First for Immune Evasive hESC-derived Cells

The lab of Yang Xu (University of California, San Diego, USA) sought to battle immune rejection of hESC-derived allografts taking advantage of the expression of immune suppressive molecules CTLA4-Ig and PD-L1. However, this represents a safety problem as both healthy and tumorigenic hESC-derived cells will evade immune surveillance following transplantation. In their new Stem Cells study, the team has created a safety checkpoint by knocking-in the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVTK) suicide gene which would allow the selective killing of “rogue” ESC-derivatives following ganciclovir (GCV) treatment.

Defining how Primed MSCs Fight Sepsis

Pretreating, or priming, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represents an interesting means to boost their therapeutic capabilities. In a new study, the lab of Yayi Hou (Nanjing University, China) has assessed the success of treating a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced mouse sepsis model with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) primed human umbilical cord-derived MSCs. Their new Stem Cells study reports that IL-1β-priming improved MSCs therapeutic capabilities by inducing an anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype via exosome-mediated transfer of miR-146a.

Nicotinamide: The Key for Functional β Cell Production?

The laboratory of Fang-Xu Jiang (The University of Western Australia) has published a recent study in which they demonstrate that the multi-functional molecule nicotinamide (NIC) promotes the differentiation of mouse islet progenitor cells (IPCs) into insulin-secreting β cells. Their Stem Cells study describes how the β cells produced can ameliorate preclinical diabetes and so, Jiang et al suggest that NIC may play an important role in bringing human stem cells derived β cells to the clinic. Do we now have the tools to create an effective cell therapy for diabetes?

iPSCs and Precision Medicine

An exciting new review article from the lab of Takashi Hamazaki (Osaka City University, Japan) discusses how induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) research may contribute to human health in the burgeoning era of precision medicine. The review discusses how iPSCs may be of use to link human DNA sequencing findings to alterations in pathobiology and treatment responses. Sounds like a fascinating read, so head over to Stem Cells now!

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

January 23,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – Treating Testosterone Deficiency, Vascular-associated Endothelial Progenitors, MSCs and ARDS, and the Potential of SVF!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Treating Testosterone Deficiency with Leydig cells

As a new way to treat testosterone deficiency, the lab of Jiang Meihua and Andy Peng Xiang (Sun Yat-sen University, Guangdong, China) has recently been assessing the potential of stem Leydig cell (SLC) transplantation. Their new study demonstrates that this strategy can restore the neuroendocrine regulation of testicular function and may represent a useful new tool for the studies of testosterone deficiency treatment. See Stem Cells now for all the details!

Will a new marker Boost Study of Vascular Associated Endothelial Cell Progenitors?

To aid the study of vascular-associated endothelial cell progenitors, the lab of Matteo Malinverno and Elisabetta Dejana (FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology (IFOM) Fondazione, Milan, Italy) has been studying Peg3/PW1 as a potentially interesting marker. Their new Stem Cells study suggests that Peg3/PW1-positive cells data identify a subset of vessel associated endothelial cells with progenitor characteristics. Furthermore, the suggest that these cells may be employed in therapies aimed at improving the perfusion of ischemic tissues or promoting vascular repair.

Reviewing MSC-based Treatments for ARDS

This week’s first review comes from the lab of Christian L. Johnson (University Hospital Regensburg, Germany) who aims to bring you up-to-date about the potential of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSCs)-based therapies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis syndrome. This new Stem Cells Translational Medicine review will summarize current preclinical and clinical knowledge, progress in disease modeling, and lessons learned from pharmacological treatments in the hope of informing and refining the design of new clinical trials.

Reviewing the Potential of Adipose-Derived SVF

The second of his weeks riveting reviews makes its way all the way from the lab of Daniel J. Kota (Sanford Research, South Dakota, USA). This time, Dykstra et al give us the low-down on the stem cell enriched adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and its regenerative potential. This Stem Cells Translational Medicine review aims to provide an overview of the current knowledge of SVF-based therapies, regulatory issues, and the possible future of this exciting area of study.

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

January 19,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – DNA-Me in DPSCs, miRNA Biomarkers, Studying IRF8 Loss, and Schwann Cell Direct Reprogramming!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Dental Stem Cells and DNA Methylation

A new study from the lab of Janine LaSalle (University of California, USA) has highlighted a great use for dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) derived from baby teeth. In a new Stem Cells study, Dunaway et al demonstrate that the DNA methylation profile of DPSCs is more similar to cells of the inner cell mass and placenta than human embryonic stem cells (ESC) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Therefore, DPSCs may represent a useful model for epigenomic and functional studies of human development.

MicroRNAs as Biomarkers for eASC Treatment of RA

New research published in Stem Cells Translational Medicine now suggests that miRNA profiles may represent a useful biomarker when assessing responses in patients treated with stem cells. Specifically, the lab of Eleuterio Lombardo (TiGenix, Madrid, Spain) has demonstrated that circulating microRNAs could be employed to measure the therapeutic response of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with expanded allogenic adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (eASCs). Great news!

Studying IRF8 loss with Engineered Pluripotent Stem Cells

Mutations leading to the loss of Interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) function lead to deficits in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and dendritic cells. To understand why, the lab of Martin Zenke (RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Germany) created IRF8-null induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) via RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing. Their new Stem Cellsstudy describes the characterization of the hematopoietic differentiation of these engineered stem cells and aims to be a jumping off point for extended studies; stay tuned to the Stem Cells Portal to find out more.

Schwann Cell Direct Reprogramming for Nerve Regeneration

Direct reprogramming techniques do away with the need for a pluripotent intermediate and simply (!) convert one abundant somatic cell into another, more utile somatic cell via the overexpression of a set of transcription factors. A new study from the lab of Osam Mazda (Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Japan) has utilized this strategy to reprogram fibroblasts into Schwann cells (SCs) capable of maintaining and regenerating the peripheral nervous system. Encouragingly, the induced SCs displayed myelin-forming capability in vivo and significantly accelerated nerve regeneration and improved motor function. See Stem Cells Translational Medicine for all the details.

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

January 16,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - S1PR3 and HSPCs, Revealing STRO-1 Antigen Identity, MSCs and Myocarditis, and hUCB-MSCs and MI Treatment!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

S1PR3 Keeps HSPCs at Home

Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) leave their bone marrow niche in response to stressful situations although just what controls their movement is relatively unknown. However, new research from the lab of Edward Botchwey (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA) has now demonstrated that the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3) expression keeps HSPCs “at home” in their niche. The authors hope that their new findings may be of use in clinical stem cell mobilization and re-engraftment strategies. See Stem Cells for all the details.

Revealing the target for the STRO-1 Antibody

The STRO-1 antibody has been used to understand mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) and their progeny for years, although the exact antigen that it targets remained a mystery. However, the lab of Andrew C.W. Zannettino (University of Adelaide, Australia) has solved this mystery and revealed that STRO-1 recognizes heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70;HSPA8)! Get on over to Stem Cells and get to the bottom of the mystery yourself!

How Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Treat Myocarditis

The treatment of Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced myocarditis with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) leads to multiple positive effects on outcome, although we currently do not understand how this happens. However, a new study from the lab of Sophie Van Linthout (Charité – University of Medicine Berlin, Germany) has now revealed that MSC treatment leads to increases in anti-inflammatory monocytes to the heart. See Stem Cells Translational Medicine now for all the details.

Engineered hUCB-MSCs for the Treatment of Myocardial Infarction

More stem cells for heart problems, but this time we are talking about the treatment of myocardial infarction with human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs). The lab of Je-Yoel Cho (Seoul National University, South Korea) have engineered a cell line with inducible VEGF expression in order to boost therapeutic effect but limit potentially deleterious side effects. Their results look promising; could this represent a new and exciting means to treat MI? See Stem Cells Translational Medicine now to see for yourself!

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

January 11,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – PRL2 and Thymic Progenitors, Boosting iPSC-RBC Production, AFSCs and Bladder Dysfunction, and Tolerance Induction by Hematopoietic Chimerism!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Thymic Progenitors and PRL2-mediated Signaling

The mechanisms which control the production of thymic progenitors from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are not well understood, but a new study from Yan Liu (Indiana University, Indianapolis, USA) and Zhong-Yin Zhang (Purdue University, Indianapolis, USA) hopes to change this fact. Their new research has highlighted the importance of the PRL2 phosphatase in mediating Notch and c-Kit signaling; get over to Stem Cells now to see all the details!

KLF1 Boosts iPSC-RBC Production

The production of red blood cells (RBCs) from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may represent an effective means to produce large amounts of patient-specific transplantable donor material. However, current protocols just don’t come up to scratch! To solve this problem, the lab of Lesley M Forrester (University of Edinburgh, UK) have employed the exogenous expression of the Erythroid Krüppel-like factor 1 (EKLF/KLF1) to improve differentiation efficiency and increase iPSC-RBC stability. See their great new study at Stem Cells now!

Treating Bladder Dysfunction with Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells

The lab of S.W. Steven Shaw (Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan, Republic of China) recently aimed to test if human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFSCs) grafting could represent a legitimate means to treat bladder dysfunction in an animal stroke model. In their new Stem Cells Translational Medicine study, Liang et al report that their strategy is effective, and may be due to an increase in the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF), M2-muscarinic, M3-muscarinic, and P2X1 receptors in the bladder.

Tolerance Induction by Hematopoietic Chimerism

One possible strategy to avoid life-long immunosuppressive therapy following cell/tissue grafting is to induce tolerance via hematopoietic chimerism. In a new Stem Cells Translational Medicine article, the lab of Nadir Askenasy (Frankel Laboratory of Experimental Bone Marrow Transplantation, Petach Tikva, Israel) provide an excellent review of the area and all the new efforts under development. Sounds like a great read!

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

January 7,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – Rare Disease Modelling, Cartilage Repair, AFSC Review, and Enriching and Selecting hPSCs!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

CRISPR/Cas9 and Rare Neurodevelopmental Disorder Modelling

CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology has huge potential in various fields and now, the lab of Carl Ernst (McGill University, Quebec, Canada) has combined CRISP/Cas9 with induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) reprogramming in order to model rare neurodevelopmental disorders. See their new Stem Cells Translational Medicine study for all the details about this new and exciting platform.

MSC-based Meniscal Cartilage Repair

A recent Stem Cells Translational Medicine study has described how mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded onto a collagen scaffold may represent an exciting means to treat the meniscal cartilage tears which predispose to osteoarthritis (OA). This study, from the lab of Anthony P. Hollander (University of Liverpool, UK), describes in vitro optimization steps and the successful application of this treatment strategy in humans. The study found significant clinical improvement and suggests that patient-derived MSCs may represent a safe way to augment meniscal repair.

Reviewing the Potential of Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells

Studies have reported that stem cells derived from human amniotic fluid (AFSCs) have multilineage differentiation potential without forming tumors, amongst other notable characteristics. So, are AFSCs an ideal stem cell population for regenerative medicine? To review all the current thinking, head over to Stem Cells and read the recent review from the lab of Paolo De Coppi (University College London, UK).

New Tools to Identify and Select hPSCs

New tools to aid the selection of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are always welcome and a new study from Carmel M. O'Brien and Andrew L. Laslett (CSIRO Manufacturing, Clayton, Victoria, Australia) now describes the generation of 7 new monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to epitopes present on the cell surface of hPSCs. Their new Stem Cells study describes how their new mAbs correlate to OCT4 expression and the presence of TRA-160 and SSEA-4, making them potentially exciting new tools.

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!