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Highlights of current exciting developments, ranging from research papers to court decisions to industry regulations

December 18, 2017

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Past Buzz

December 14,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Induced Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells, MSC Treatment for DRE, iPSC-derived Corneal Epithelial Cells, and Stem Cell Therapy for CLI!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

iPSC-Derived Mesenchymal Cells for Nerve Repair

Researchers from the laboratory of Rocky S. Tuan (University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, USA) set themselves a lofty goal: build a better mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)! Their new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study now describes the production of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (MiMPCs), which secrete various neurotrophic and neuroprotective factors and promote neurite outgrowth in chick embryonic dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cultures. Brick et al. suggest that this new and improved MSC-like cell may represent a renewable source of therapeutic cells and a potential alternative to MSCs for peripheral nerve repair.

BM-MSC Transplantations Improve DRE in Children

As a new treatment option for drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) in children, researchers working in the lab of Marcin Majka (Jagiellonian University Collegium Medicum, Cracow, Poland) have assessed the safety, feasibility, and potential efficacy of autologous bone marrow cell (BM-MSC) transplantation. The results of this pilot study, published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, report no adverse events and neurological and cognitive improvement in all patients, including a reduction in the number of epileptic seizures and an absence of status epilepticus episodes. Great news!

Differentiation of hiPSCs to Corneal Epithelial Cells

Limbal stem cell (LSC) transplantation represents an interesting regenerative measure in the fight against limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) and the loss of the corneal epithelial layer. However, given the scarcity of LSCs, researchers have sought to discover alternative strategy and now, researchers from the laboratory of Majlinda Lako (Newcastle University, UK) report on the generation of corneal epithelial cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Interestingly, Kamarudin et al. demonstrate that different hiPSC lines displayed differential differentiation propensities due to differential activity of the endogenous BMP signaling pathway. See STEM CELLS now for all the details!

Stem Cell Therapy for Critical Limb Ischemia

Severe critical limb ischemia (CLI) currently relies on limb amputation as the only treatment option; however, many research teams hope that stem cell-based interventions may improve this unfavorable outcome. To help us wade through the pertinent data, the good people from the lab of David A. Hess (Western University, Ontario, Canada) have brought together an “Integrated Review of Pre-clinical and Clinical Studies”. See STEM CELLS now for a vital read.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

December 11,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Müller Glia-Derived Progenitor Cells, hPSC Osteogenesis, lncRNA-mediated Differentiation, and MSC in vivo Kinetics!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Deciphering RA-mediated control of MGPCs

Researchers from the laboratory of Andy J. Fischer (Ohio State University, USA) recently employed a chick model system to decipher how retinoic acid (RA)-signaling influences the proliferation and the formation of Müller glia-derived progenitor cells (MGPCs). Their STEM CELLS study suggests that Müller glia of damaged retinas upregulate cellular RA binding proteins (CRABP), leading to the formation of proliferating MGPCs and the enhancement of the neurogenic potential of MGPCs and stem cells in the circumferential marginal zone (CMZ).

Epigenetic Influence on hPSC Osteogenesis

The process by which human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts represents and incompletely understood process. However, researchers from the lab of Nicole I. zur Nieden (University of California Riverside, USA) now suggest that epigenetic patterns at critical regulatory genes (osteocalcin (OCN), PAX7, and TWIST1) can strongly influence lineage derivation and mineralization. See STEM CELLS now for all the details!

Controlling Neural Differentiation via lncRNAs

Rather than osteogenesis, the labs of Guiying Wang and Jiuhong Kang (Tongji University, Shanghai, China) have sought to determine all there is to know about neurogenesis from embryonic stem cells (ESCs)! Their new STEM CELLS study describes how a newly discovered long noncoding RNA (lncRNA-1604) functions as a novel competing endogenous RNA of miR-200c and a regulator of the core transcription factors ZEB1 and ZEB2 during neural differentiation. Sounds like a fantastic study!

Reviewing in vivo Kinetics of MSCs

Researchers from the laboratories of Michael S. Roberts and Haolu Wang (University of Queensland, Australia) believe that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) therapy optimization may be accelerated via the understanding of MSC distribution in vivo, long-term viability, as well as their biological fate. Their new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine review outlines current knowledge of in vivo kinetics of MSCs, analyses methods employed for MSC detection, discusses the pharmacokinetic modeling of these data, and provides insights on the future development of effective therapeutic strategies using pharmacokinetic modeling.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

December 1,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Treating Ischemic Retinopathies, Anti-tumor Immune Cells, MSC Rejection Trial, and Huntington's Disease!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Optimizing ECFC Treatment of Ischemic Retinopathies

Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) promote vascular repair and regeneration of the ischemic retina, although the application of this strategy to human patients will require extensive preclinical testing. A recent report from the lab of Reinhold J. Medina (Queen's University Belfast, United Kingdom) establishes that systemic or intravitreal administration of an appropriate dose of ECFCs confers therapeutic benefit without eliciting an immune response or toxicity. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now to see how this study provides excellent preclinical evidence for ECFC treatment of ischemic retinopathies.

Generating iPSCs from Anti-tumor Immune Cells for Immunotherapy

A small proportion of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood known as γδT cells exert potent anti-tumor activity; however, ex vivo expansion to the large numbers required for therapy leads to a loss in effectiveness. As a means to get around this vexing problem, researchers from the laboratory of Takashi Aoi (Kobe University, Japan) have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from stimulated γδT cells in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) culture. Resultant γδT-iPSCs displayed rearrangements at the TCRG and TCRD gene locus and demonstrated the ability to differentiate into hematopoietic progenitors. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now to see how this strategy could pave the way toward novel immunotherapy treatments.

MSC Pilot Trial for Acute Liver Allograft Rejection

A STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study from Ming Shi and Fu-Sheng Wang (Beijing 302 Hospital, PR China) has recently reported the findings of a trial of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cell (UC-MSC) therapy in liver transplant patients with acute graft rejection. Encouragingly, the results suggest that “UC-MSC infusion for acute graft rejection following liver transplantation is feasible and may mediate a therapeutic immunosuppressive effect.” Great news!

Stem Cells and Huntington's Disease

A new review article from Bronwen Connor (University of Auckland, New Zealand) in STEM CELLS aims to highlight the potential for stem cell-based therapeutics for Huntington's disease (HD). This review covers compensatory neurogenesis, cell replacement therapies, and cell reprogramming to model and treat the disease and aims to delineate potential gaps in knowledge and identify future directions. Sounds like a fascinating read!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

November 23,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Lung Patterning, Injury-induced Transdifferentiation, MSC Pilot Study, and Universal Mutation Correction!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Lung Patterning Regulated by Long non-coding RNA Expression

Regulation of lung development is a multifactorial affair, and researchers from the labs of Anurag Varshney and Rajarshi Pal sought to assess how long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) expression affected lung morphogenesis. In their new STEM CELLS study, Banerjee et al. differentiated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into distal and proximal lung progenitors to mimic in vivo lung development and discovered a role for a novel lncRNA (RP11‐ 380D23.2) during distal‐proximal patterning. The authors suggest that this new lncRNA inhibits the chromatin binding of the PITX2 repressor PARP1 to mediate its effect.

Lung Injury-induced Transdifferentiation of Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Cells

Tissue repair techniques include replacement of cells by the expansion and lineage conversion, or transdifferentiation, of healthy tissue resident cells. Researchers from the labs of Hai Song (Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China) and Pao-Tien Chuang (University of California, USA) sought to assess transdifferentiation of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs) in response to lung injury. Interestingly, Yao et al. discovered that injury leads to increased Notch expression in PNECs, which promoted proliferation and transdifferentiation into club cells, ciliated cells, and goblet cells. Transdifferentiation required epigenetic alterations mediated by the polycomb repressive complex 2 and inflammatory responses that involve the IL6-STAT3 pathway. See STEM CELLS now for all the details.


Pilot Study of MSCs for Islet Cotransplantation

A new study from the lab of Hongjun Wang (Medical University of South Carolina, USA) sought to assess if cotransplantation of ex vivo expanded autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could improve islet engraftment in human patients. The results of this trial, published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, indicate the safety of this strategy and that it represents a potentially exciting approach to improve islet engraftment after transplantation. The authors note that their results justify a larger and randomized clinical trial, as MSCs display the potential to reduce inflammatory damage and support angiogenesis in transplanted islets.

Universal CRISPR-Cas9 Mutation Correction Strategy in Human Stem Cells

The correction of each single mutation via CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing requires a tailored approach; however, a new study from Linzhao Cheng (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Maryland, USA) and Zhaohui Ye (US Food and Drug Administration, Maryland, USA) now reports on a universal means to correct all possible mutations in the exon of a gene. This universal correction strategy employs the targeted insertion of a wildtype HBB cDNA in exon 1 of the HBB gene via the application of Cas9 and two validated guide RNAs in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Excitingly, Cai et al. demonstrate that this approach leads to the restoration of HBB protein in iPSC-derived erythrocytes. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for all the details!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

November 20,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Compounding Factors, Muscle Stem Cells, Hemogenic Endothelium, and Endothelial Progenitor Cells!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Understanding Confounding Factors in Models of Human Erythropoiesis

Confounding factors, or intrinsic parameters within the experimental approach that bias the results, represent a significant problem for many models of healthy development and disease. While many early studies of the human erythropoiesis uncovered some simple confounding factors, each new and improved model highlights yet more! Now, a new review article from Anna Rita Migliaccio and Lilian Varricchio (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA) hopes to illustrate new confounding factors and discuss their clinical translation potential to improve our understanding erythroid disorders such as Diamond Blackfan Anemia. See STEM CELLS now for a riveting read!

Regulating Quiescent and Activated Muscle Stem Cells

A new study from the lab of Yusuke Ono (Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Japan) studied roles for Notch1 and Notch2 expression in muscle stem cells. Fujimaki et al. report that Notch1 and Notch2 function together to maintain a quiescent stem-cell pool (by preventing activation) and to regulate stem-cell-fate decision in the activated state. For all the details on how Notch1 and 2 govern adult muscle regeneration, see STEM CELLS now.

Defining Transcriptional Signatures of the Hemogenic Endothelium

To characterize the mechanisms underlying human definitive hematopoietic development, researchers from the lab of Dan S. Kaufman (University of California-San Diego, USA) set out to study the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT). Angelos et al. employed single cell RNA-seq of various cell types to demonstrate a common developmental pathway between human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived hemogenic endothelial cells and hematopoietic progenitor cells. The authors of this new STEM CELLS study hope to apply this strategy to test new genetic targets and optimize hematopoietic development from hESCs.

Regulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells with HAX-1

Precious studies had linked expression of Hematopoietic-substrate-1 associated protein X-1 (HAX-1) to tumorigenesis; however, researchers from the lab of Xin-bin Guo (First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, China) explored a role for HAX-1 expression in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Their new STEM CELLS study now suggests that the high levels of HAX-1 expression noted in EPCs promotes proliferation and inhibits apoptosis via a decline in p53 tumor suppressor levels.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

November 13,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Boosting hMSC Osteogenesis, Accelerating Stem Cell Trials, Investigating Impaired Cardiac Repair, and Maintaining HCC CSCs!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

RUNX2 Programs hMSC Osteogenesis

Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) may possess tri-lineage differentiation potential, but stimulating high levels of osteogenesis has proven a tricky proposition. A new report from the lab of James E. Dixon (University of Nottingham, United Kingdom) now describes an efficient new osteogenic strategy: the application of non-virally derived recombinant RUNX2 protein via the glycosaminoglycan-binding enhanced transduction (GET) delivery system (GET-RUNX2). Excitingly, the high transduction efficiency of the GET system allowed GET-RUNX2 to trigger osteogenesis in hMSCs by enhancing target gene expression directly. For all the details on this approach to repair bone trauma and disorders without genetic modifications, see STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now!

Accelerating Stem Cells Clinical Trials via Nursing Competencies

A recent Perspective article from Rodica Stan describes the experience of the establishment of a California Institute for Regenerative Medicine-associated Alpha Stem Cell Clinic at the City of Hope (California, USA). Perrin et al. report the definition of the “hybrid nurse” role, a person with nursing competencies in both clinical care and research, as the highlight of the process and the key to success. Head over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now to understand how nursing competencies play a crucial role in the stem cell clinic.

Impaired Cardiac Repair in Diabetes: A Role for SDF-1:CXCR4

Diabetes causes impaired post-acute myocardial infarction (AMI) cardiac repair, and a new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study from the lab of Feng Dong (Northeast Ohio Medical University, Ohio, USA) sought to figure out why! Mayorga et al. now report the dysregulation of the SDF-1:CXCR4 axis, which controls the mobilization and migration of stem cells from the BM to the site of tissue injury, in a disease-specific mouse model. However, this new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study also demonstrates that overexpression of SDF-1 may represent a potentially exciting treatment option.

Translation Elongation Factor Helps to maintain Hepatocellular Carcinoma CSCs

Deciphering the mechanisms that regulate cancer stem cells (CSCs) may permit the development of potent anti-cancer therapies. In a previous study, researchers from the lab of Dan Xie (Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China) demonstrated that overexpression of the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A2 (EIF5A2) promoted hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell metastasis and angiogenesis. Now, their new STEM CELLS study suggests that EIF5A2 contributes to the maintenance of HCC CSCs via the c-Myc/miR-29b axis, raising the possibility of developing a new CSCs‐specific therapy.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

November 9,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Hematopoietic Regulation and Regeneration, Restoration of Dysfunctional Endothelial Progenitor Cells, and the Production of Mature Heart Muscle!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Reviewing the Epigenetic Regulation of Hematopoiesis

The title for this Stem Cells Buzz article says it all! Straight out of the lab of Annarita Miccio (Imagine Institute, Paris, France) comes a summary of recent epigenetic and genetic studies in hematopoietic cells that have provided fresh insight into human hematopoiesis and have stimulated the construction of novel therapeutic approaches. For all the details on this new article from Antoniani et al., scoot on over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine!

PPARα Microparticles Reprogram Dysfunctional Bone Marrow EPCs

Patients suffering from various metabolic pathologies present with a compromised vascular system caused partly by dysfunctional bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Now, a team of researchers from lab of Maria Carmen Martinez (Université Angers, France) has reprogrammed EPCs via small membrane vesicles known as microparticles (MPs) carrying the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα), which promotes EPC maturation and myeloid lineage differentiation. While EPCs from mice fed on a high-fat diet displayed reduced levels of circulating EPCs and impaired EPC and monocytic progenitor cell differentiation, treatment with MPs carrying PPARα restored the lost differentiation capacity and enhanced in vivoangiogenesis. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for all the details.

Synergistically Regenerating Hematopoiesis

To boost hematopoietic regeneration following chemotherapy, researchers from the lab of Phuong L. Doan (Duke University, Durham, NC, USA) sought out a synergistic solution. In their new STEM CELLS study, Piryani et al. demonstrated that co-treatment with the epidermal growth factor (EGF) hematopoietic growth factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) efficiently accelerated hematopoietic regeneration. Their study also indicated that EGF upregulated the receptor for G‐CSF (G‐CSFR), and so this new combination could represent an effective means to treat chemotherapy‐induced myelosuppression.

A Little Stretch Induces Engineered Heart Muscle Function

While the efficiency of cardiomyocytes differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) keeps on rising with each study, the problem of functional immaturity remains. New research from Joseph C. Wu and Oscar J. Abilez (Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA) employed computational modeling to test the effects of “passive stretch” on iPSC-derived heart tissue maturation. Excitingly, a little stretching significantly affected structural and functional maturation and thereby, may represent an essential step towards the clinical application of functional engineered heart tissues. Stretch your legs (or fingers?) and head over to STEM CELLS to read more!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

November 6,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – Inflammatory Cycling in MSCs, Slimming-down MSCs with Vesicles, Boosting Bone and Cartilage Regeneration, and Trialing Autologous Cord Blood!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

MSCs-EVs Caught in an Inflammatory Cycle

A new study by the lab of Matthew T. Harting (University of Texas McGovern Medical School, USA) has suggested that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs) may be caught in an inflammatory cycle! Specifically, their new STEM CELLS study demonstrates that inflammatory stimulation of MSCs results in the release of EVs with enhanced anti-inflammatory effects, attributed in part to COX2/PGE2 expression. Could this new report lead to the construction of EV therapeutic strategies for inflammatory injury and disease?

Vesicles Help 3D MSCs Slim Down

Vesicles also play a significant role in our next study from the laboratory of Yaojiong Wu (Tsinghua University, China). Their new STEM CELLS study sought to delineate the mechanisms behind mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) size reduction under three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions. A decrease in MSC size, as compared to typical two-dimensional culture, reduces lung vascular obstructions following MSC therapy and this new study suggests that MSCs “slim down” by increasing vesicle excretion mediated by lowering cytoskeleton tension. Sounds like a great read!

Boosting Cartilage and Bone Regeneration: A Review

A new review article from researchers from the laboratory of Ennio Tasciotti (Houston Methodist Research Institute, Texas, USA) aims to highlight the limitations of musculoskeletal regeneration and summarize the most relevant acellular tissue engineering approaches. This review maintains a focus on strategies likely to be efficiently translated into clinical practice and reflects on contemporary and cutting-edge regenerative approaches in surgery. While studies have highlighted a range of preclinical solutions for bone and cartilage regeneration, only a few platforms have been able to move from the bench to the bedside. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for a timely review article!

Trialing Autologous Cord Blood Infusion in Young Cerebral Palsy Patients

STEM CELLS Translational Medicine brings us the results of a recent trial carried out by the laboratory of Jessica Sun (Duke University Medical Center, California, USA). The authors describe a Phase II trial of autologous cord blood (ACB) infusions in children with Cerebral palsy (CP) to test whether this approach could improve motor functions (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01147653; IND 14360). In brief, the results demonstrate that appropriately dosed ACB infusions have the potential to improve brain connectivity and gross motor function in young children with CP. Encouraging news!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

November 2,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - ASC-mediated Vasculogenesis, Inhibition of PSC Tumorigenesis, Stem Cells and Cancer, and MSC Characterization!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

ASC-derived NOTCH2 Promotes Vasculogenesis

Researchers from the lab of Vincenzo Terlizzi (University of Groningen, Netherlands) hope that adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC) can functionally replace the pericytes lost during diabetic retinopathy (DR) and boost the formation of the vasculature. Their new study demonstrates that NOTCH2 secretion by ASCs promotes in vitro vasculogenesis in 2D and 3D in vitro and promotes ASC migration to the retinal microenvironment. For all the details on this fascinating study, head over to STEM CELLS now.

A New Means to inhibit hPSC Tumorigenesis

While the transplantation of cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) seems to have a bright future, there still exist concerns regarding the potential tumorigenicity of “leftover” undifferentiated cells. To combat these fears, the group of Ken-ichiro Kosai (Kagoshima University, Japan) has described a novel method for the efficient generation of tumorigenic cell-targeting lentiviral vectors (TC-LVs) with various promoters upstream of a fluorescent protein and suicide genes. See STEM CELLS for all the fine print on this new tumorigenic cell-killing strategy.

MSCs and Cancer: A Review

Studies suggest that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may play roles in both the promotion and inhibition of cancer progression.  A new review article from the lab of Gianpaolo Papaccio (Università degli Studi della Campania, Naples, Italy) discusses recent findings in the hope of clarifying the pivotal role of MSCs in cancer development and determining their potential use in cancer treatment. See STEM CELLS now for a great read!

Characterizing MSCs: An Essential Step for Regenerative Medicine

The widespread application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in regenerative therapies inspired our next review from the labs of Simon Cool (A-STAR, Singapore) and Andre van Wijnen (Mayo Clinic, USA). The authors suggest that wide-ranging characterization metrics for MSCs may more accurately predict treatment outcomes of MSC-based therapies. Additionally, the duo discuss currently appreciated characteristics of MSCs and consider recent studies that describe potentially valuable criteria when considering clinical applications. STEM CELLS Translational Medicine has all the juicy details, what are you waiting for?!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

October 30,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Distal Limb Wound Healing, Dentin-Pulp Tissue Regeneration, Report from the ISCBI, and MSCs Requirement for Survivin!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

MSC-mediated Healing of Distal Limb Wounds

Both humans and horses may benefit from allogeneic mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy for distal extremity wounds. To assess the potential benefits of this treatment option, researchers from the laboratory of Dori L. Borjesson (UC Davis, California, USA) assessed gross, histologic, and transcriptional features of healing in a horse model. Encouragingly, Textor et al. discovered that direct injection of MSCs into the wound margin correlated to smaller wound area and improved histologic outcomes and the authors hope that their finding may be directly applicable to chronic wound studies in human patients. Stop horsing around and head over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine for more details.

PDGF-BB Boosts Stem Cell-Based Dentin-Pulp Tissue Regeneration

An exciting new study in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine from Xinquan Jiang and Wenjie Zhang (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, PR China) sought to delineate how platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) promotes dental pulp stem cell (DPSC)-mediated dentin-pulp complex regeneration. Zhang et al. discovered that the PDGF-BB dimer enhanced DPSC proliferation and odontoblastic differentiation, stimulated angiogenesis, and facilitated migration via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway activation. All these enhancements permitted PDGF-BB gene-modified DPSCs to generate more dentin-like mineralized tissue surrounded by highly vascularized dental pulp-like connective tissue than unmodified DPSCs!

International Stem Cell Banking Initiative Workshop Activity Report

A recent article from Glyn N. Stacey (UK stem Cell Bank) and Soo Kyung Koo (Korea National Institute of Health) reviews recent discussions among world-leading groups working on the provision of stem cell lines for research and clinical use, which addresses the latest thinking on in issues of quality control, safety, and ethics. A key outcome from the reported workshops in the USA and Korea was the confirmation of the need for standards, and, in particular, the principles of best practice developed by the International Stem Cell Banking Initiative. For all the details, see STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now!

An Essential Role for Survivin in MSCs

A new study from the labs of Louis M. Pelus and Pratibha Singh (Indiana University, USA) demonstrates that Survivin regulates mouse and human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) function and suggest that clinical application of Survivin may enhance MSC recovery and activity following insult or stress. In their new STEM CELLS study, Singh et al. show how MSC survival (surprise!), expansion, lineage commitment, and migration require Survivin. In vivo analysis also established that Survivin loss suppressed MSC migration to a wound site and compromised their hematopoiesis-supporting capacity.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!