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Highlights of current exciting developments, ranging from research papers to court decisions to industry regulations

July 16, 2018

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Past Buzz

July 4,2018 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Proteoglycan Morphogenetic Markers, ESC PTM Regulation by LRRN1, Runx1-mediated Cell Proliferation, and Preconditioned MSCs for Bone Repair!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Proteoglycans as Morphogenetic Markers of Tissue Development

A new review article from the lab of James Melrose (Royal North Shore Hospital and University of Sydney, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia) brings an update on the importance of surface chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in stem cells. Hayes et al. describe how cell surface proteoglycans can provide valuable information on pluripotency and differentiation potential of various stem cells and how they can also be employed to monitor tissue morphogenetic changes in development and tissue repair. For more information, read all the details at STEM CELLS.

LRRN1 Regulates ESCs via Pluripotency Factor PTMs

Continuing with glycoproteins, new research led by John Yu (Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan) recently discovered the abundant expression of a surface glycoprotein, leucine‐rich repeat neuronal protein 1 (LRRN1), on self-renewing human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Liao et al. now report that LRRN1 may help to maintain the stability of pluripotency factors such as OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 via post-translational modifications, thus maintaining hESC self‐renewal capacity and pluripotency. For more details on LRRN1, head over to STEM CELLS now!

A Lipidic Role of Runx1 in Epithelial and Cancer Cell Proliferation

A new study from the lab of Tudorita Tumbar (Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA) recently sought to discern the role of lipid metabolism in epithelial stem cell (SC) function and carcinogenesis. Interestingly, Jain et al. discovered that the epithelial stem cell- and cancer-associated factor Runx1 controlled the expression of the Scd1 and Soat1 lipid metabolism-associated genes. This mediated the control of fatty acid production to subsequently modulate membrane organization and facilitate signal transduction for rapid proliferation of both normal and cancer epithelial cells. For more on this exciting new study, see STEM CELLS now!

Hypoxic Preconditioning of MSCs for Bone Repair

Both hypoxic preconditioning and spheroidal aggregation promote mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) survival, engraftment, and therapeutic potential for musculoskeletal tissue repair. Researchers from the lab of J. Kent Leach (University of California, Davis, California, USA) recently tested the effects of the combined hypoxic preconditioning of MSCs grown as spheroids for bone repair. Reporting in STEM CELLS, Ho et al. now demonstrate that MSCs cultivated in this manner displayed the greatest osteogenic potential in vitro and enhanced bone healing following transplantation into rat critical‐sized femoral segmental defects. Overall, this suggests that hypoxic preconditioning combined with spheroid growth may represent a simple approach to improve MSC-based bone healing.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

June 11,2018 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - ESRP1 and Pluripotency, DNA Damage and iPSCs, Prokineticin and Epicardial Stemness, and Age-Related Clonal Hematopoiesis!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

ESRP1 as a Key Regulator of Human Pluripotency

A recent study from the lab of Yee Sook Cho (Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea) sought to fully appreciate the link between epithelial splicing regulatory protein 1 (ESRP1) expression and human pluripotency. Interestingly, Kim et al. discovered the specific expression of only specific ESRP1 isoforms in pluripotent stem cells controlled the isoform-specific expression of the cell surface protein CD44. For more on this exciting new finding, see STEM CELLS now!

High Gamma-H2AX Associates with Replication in iPSCs

Researchers from the lab of Deborah A. Hursh (United States Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD, USA) recently reported that the rapid replication of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) leads to the appearance of increased basal levels of gamma-H2AX, a marker of DNA damage. Interestingly, DNA damage is lower in original donor fibroblasts and iPSC-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Vallabhaneni et al. hope that their results, published in STEM CELLS, will aid in the understanding of factors that contribute to the safety of iPSCs in clinical applications.

Prokineticin and Human Epicardial Cell Stemness

Human epicardium‐derived progenitor cells (hEPDCs) may give rise to epicardial adipose tissues and vascular tissues in the developing and injured heart. New research led by Canan G. Nebigil (University of Strasbourg, CNRS (UMR 7242), France) now suggests that the angiogenic hormone Prokineticin controls anti‐adipogenic and pro‐vasculogenic differentiations of hEPDCs via an epigenetic “switch”. Qureshi et al. suggest that their findings may pave the way for innovative new treatments for heart failure; see the full article at STEM CELLS now to find out!

Reviewing Age-Related Clonal Hematopoiesis

A recent review article from Lambert Busque (Hôpital Maisonneuve‐Rosemont, Montréal, Québec, Canada) discusses the recent characterization of clonal hematopoiesis in a large segment of the aging population, a finding that has raised tremendous interest and concern. Studies have documented mutations in genes associated with hematological cancers, and although these individuals maintained blood cell production, a minority will progress to hematologic malignancies. For this reason, the risk factors for progression must be identified, with clonal hematopoiesis offering an opportunity to understand the biology and adaptation mechanisms of aging and mechanisms of malignant transformation. See STEM CELLS for the full story.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

June 4,2018 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - LSC Pigmentation and Stemness, ASC-treatment of Rotator cuff Disease, Genome-editing of Aniridia‐related Keratopathy, and Current Understanding and Prostate CSCs!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Pigmentation and Stemness in Limbal Stem Cell Cultures

To aid in the identification of early human limbal epithelial stem cells (hLESCs), researchers from the lab of Vladimir Zachar (Aalborg University, Denmark) recently sought to assess the utility of tumor protein p63 (p63) and ATP binding cassette subfamily B member 5 (ABCB5) as markers. In a new STEM CELLS study, Liu et al. now report that p63, but not ABCB5, predicts the immaturity of hLESCs and reveal a link between stemness with pigmentation. The authors hope that these finding will aid help to enhance the ex vivo culture of hLESCs employed to treat human limbal stem cell deficiency.

Adipose-derived Stem Cell Injections for Rotator cuff Disease

A recent study led by Chris H. Jo (Seoul National University College of Medicine, Korea) aimed to discover the potential utility of intratendinous injection of autologous adipose-tissue-derived MSCs (ASCs) in patients with rotator cuff disease, a leading cause of shoulder pain. Jo et al. have now established the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of this approach and report some evidence of tendon defect regeneration in the absence of surgical interventions. Overall, the authors of this new STEM CELLS study hope to create a paradigm shift from surgery to stem cells in patients suffering from this condition.

Genome-editing of Aniridia‐related Keratopathy and Rescue

Heterozygous PAX6 gene mutations cause the rare and progressive panocular disease congenital aniridia and the vast majority of patients also suffer from aniridia‐related keratopathy (ARK). As a means to search for effective treat ARK, researchers from the lab of Daniel Aberdam (INSERM U976, Hôpital Saint‐Louis, Paris, France) employed CRISPR/Cas9 to introduce the PAX6 mutation in patient-derived limbal stem cells (LSCs) to create a testable model. In their new STEM CELLS study, Roux et al. describe the construction of this model and identify a soluble recombinant PAX6 protein as a possible treatment.

Current Understanding on Prostate CSCs

A new review article from STEM CELLS from the lab of Anna Dubrovska aims to bring us up to date with what we currently understand regarding cancer stem cells (CSCs) in prostate cancer. Specifically, Skvortsov et al. discuss current methods for prostate CSC enrichment and analysis, the hallmarks of prostate CSC metabolism, and the role of prostate CSCs in tumor progression.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

May 27,2018 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Umbilical Cord Blood Banking, MSC-based Wound Healing, Strap-mediated ESC Differentiation, and EPC‐derived Mitochondria in Brain Protection!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Evolving Landscape of Umbilical Cord Blood Banking

Umbilical cord blood (UCB) banking provides an off‐the‐shelf solution for patients in urgent need of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, the release of UCB units for therapeutic purposes has plateaued and started to decrease year‐on‐year from 2013 to 2016. Researchers from the lab of Michael S. Pepper (University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa) sought to uncover the reasons behind this trend in a new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article. They report that the emergence of haploidentical HSCT, the increasing use of UCB units for regenerative medicine purposes, the high cost associated with UCB transplantation, the economic impact of sustaining public bank operations, and an active private UCB banking sector all play influencing roles.

MSC for Lasting Wound Healing of Irradiated Skin

A new study from the lab of Christine Linard (Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, Fontenay‐aux‐Roses, France) sought to investigate the potential application of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) as a means to improve plastic surgery for skin necrosis, in a large‐animal model of cutaneous radiation syndrome. The team discovered that vascularized flap surgery successfully and lastingly remodeled irradiated skin only when combined with BM‐MSC therapy. For all the details, see STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now!

Strap in Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

Researchers from the lab of Pran K. Datta (University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA) recently set out to investigate the functional role of the WD‐domain protein Strap (serine-threonine kinase receptor‐associated protein) in the pluripotency and lineage commitment of murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Jin et al. report that Strap knockout mESCs exhibit defects for lineage differentiation due to attenuated intracellular retinoic acid signaling and the induced expression of Cyp26A1. For the entire story, head over to STEM CELLS now!

EPC‐derived Mitochondria Protect Brain Endothelium

Recent studies have suggested that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) release and transfer mitochondria when employed as a treatment for stroke and central nervous system injury. Now, research led by Kazuhide Hayakawa, Eng H. Lo, and Anna Rosell have established that EPCs support brain endothelial energetics, barrier integrity, and angiogenic function partly through extracellular mitochondrial transfer. For more on this exciting new advance, make your way over to STEM CELLS now!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

May 24,2018 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - ACE2 Deficiency Exacerbates Diabetic Defects, Role of Coiled‐coil Mbd3 Domain, OCT4 in Human Cancer, and 3D Organoids as Pre‐Clinical Models

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

ACE2 Deficiency Exacerbates Diabetic Retinopathy via Bone Marrow Dysfunction

A recent STEM CELLS study from the laboratory of Maria B Grant (University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA) sought to test if the primary enzyme of the vasoprotective axis of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exacerbates diabetic retinopathy by promoting bone marrow stem cell dysfunction. Through experiments employing Angiotensin‐converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) knockout mice, Duan et al. now suggest that sustained activation of RAS in bone marrow stem cells will prevent the development of diabetic retinopathy. Sounds like a fascinating study!

Crucial Role of Coiled‐coil Domain of Mbd3 in Pluripotency

While studies have revealed that methyl‐CpG‐binding domain protein 3 (Mbd3), a scaffolding component of the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase complex, regulates pluripotency, the functional similarities and dissimilarities among the three isoforms (a, b, and c) remain unexplored. Now, new research from the lab of Akihiko Okuda (Saitama Medical University, Japan) suggests that the coiled‐coil domain common to all three Mbd3 isoforms helps to maintain pluripotency via the recruitment of polycomb repressive complex 2 to a subset of genes linked to development and organogenesis, thus establishing stable transcriptional repression. Head over to STEM CELLS now for all the details.

New Study Forges Strong Links between OCT4 and Human Cancer

In an attempt to end the debate regarding OCT4 expression in human cancer, researchers from the laboratory of Mitsuko Kosaka (Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan) developed a highly specific and comprehensive detection method. Writing in STEM CELLS, Miyamoto et al. report clear evidence for cancer cell-specific expression of OCT4A, OCT4B, OCT4B1 and other novel splicing variant transcripts. Interestingly, expression correlates with correlated with the migration and invasion, strongly suggesting a significant contribution of OCT4 to the phenotype of human cancer cells.

Current Status of 3D Organoids as Pre‐Clinical Models

A new STEM CELLS article from the labs of Moorthy P. Ponnusamy and Surinder K. Batra (University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA) aims to review the current status of three-dimensional (3D) organoid cultures in the study of tissue homeostasis and cancer. Kaushik et al. focus on recent technical advances, stem cell biology principles utilized to generate multiple organoids with the aim of expanding organoid applications to the study disease progression and drug response in different cancers, while also discussing shortcomings, limitations, and advantages of developed 3D cultures.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

May 21,2018 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - UCB for Ischemic Stroke, Wound Healing with UCB, Scar Reduction by OSKM, and Using Fat to Fight Disease!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Allogeneic Cord Blood in Ischemic Stroke

Given the ever-rising prevalence of ischemic stroke and the lack of viable treatment options, many studies have begun to investigate cell-based therapies to improve functional outcomes in patients. A recent STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article from the lab of Ellen R. Bennett (Duke University, Durham, NC, USA) reports on their phase 1 open‐label trial to assess the safety and feasibility of a single IV infusion of non‐human leukocyte antigen-matched, ABO-matched, unrelated allogeneic umbilical cord blood (UCB) into adult stroke patients. Laskowitz et al. report the safety of this approach and note improvements in neurological and functional evaluations in every patient, thereby supporting the conduct of a randomized, placebo‐controlled phase 2 study.

Treatment of Wounds with Umbilical Cord Blood

With a rise in the number of patients suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) comes an increase in the incidence of related chronic wounds and amputations. However, a new study from the lab of Ian M. Rogers (Lunenfeld‐Tanenbaum Research Institute, Sinai Health System, Canada) now demonstrates that in vitro cultured umbilical cord blood (UCB) CD34+ stem cells from frozen units accelerate wound healing and result in the regeneration of full-thickness skin in a mouse diabetes model. Whiteley et al. note that this data supports the retention of therapeutic properties in UCB cells following the freezing of umbilical cord units. Discover more over at STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now.

Scar Reduction by Reprogramming Factors

Recent studies have suggested that partial reprogramming via the transient expression of the OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and C‐MYC (OSKM) transcription factors may represent an exciting means to regenerate damaged tissues in vivo. Now, new research from the lab of Hans R. Schöler (Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Münster, Germany) establishes that OSKM induction in cutaneous wounds of transgenic mice causes diminished fibroblast transdifferentiation to myofibroblasts and wound contraction, the downregulation of profibrotic marker genes, and reduced scar tissue formation. For a deeper dive into the data, see STEM CELLS now.

Employing Fat to Fight Disease

Researchers from the lab of Bruce A. Bunnell (Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, USA) bring us a review of the safety and efficacy of adipose stem cells (ASCs) and the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue in treating common diseases and the next steps in research that must occur prior to clinical use. Overall, Bateman et al. report that SVF and ASC represent promising therapies for a variety of human diseases, particularly for patients with severe cases refractory to current medical treatments, although randomized controlled trials must be performed to elaborate potential safety and efficacy before clinical use. For all the details, make your way over to STEM CELLS right now!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

May 14,2018 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – Pericyte-mediated Cardiovascular Healing, MSC-Derived Microvesicles, Allogeneic Stem Cell Therapy for RDEB, and MSC-aided Islet Transplantation!

 

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond! 

 

Reviewing the Potential for Pericytes in Cardiovascular Healing

Pericytes, the mural cells of blood microvessels, represent a promising therapeutic candidate for non-revascularizable coronary artery disease (CAD) due to their angiogenic capacities and their “robustness” in response to a hypoxic environment. A new STEM CELLS review article from the Paolo Mededdu lab (University of Bristol, UK) now summarizes the rationale behind and the current progress towards pericyte‐based cell therapy. Cathery et al. also consider different sources of pericytes and harvesting pericytes from cardiovascular surgery and go onto discuss preclinical animal models of myocardial ischemia and current practices to upgrade the production protocol for translation to the clinic.

MSC-Derived Microvesicles Stabilize Lung Endothelium

Previous studies from the lab of Jae‐Woo Lee (University of California San Francisco, USA) suggested that mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-derived microvesicles (MVs) reduced lung inflammation, protein permeability, and pulmonary edema in endotoxin‐induced acute lung injury in mice. In their new study, Hu et al. now demonstrate that MSC-MVs restore protein permeability across injured human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs) by increasing Ang1 transcription and secretion into the injured endothelium, which prevents “actin stress fiber” formation. For more on this story, head over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

Allogeneic Stem Cell Therapy for Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

Previous studies from the laboratory of Mitchell S. Cairo (New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA) highlighted a role for human cord blood‐derived unrestricted somatic stem cell treatment to promote wound healing and ameliorate the blistering phenotype in a recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) mouse model. In their new study, Liao et al. demonstrate significant therapeutic benefits of human allogeneic placental‐derived stem cell (HPDSC) treatment and establish that HPDSCs migrate to the skin and gastrointestinal tract to significantly improve the adherence of the epidermis to the dermis of the skin. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for more on this exciting new study!

MSCs in Islet Transplantation

We end this week with a Perspective from the laboratory of Peter M. Jones (King's College London, UK), who discuss how factors secreted from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold the potential to improve islet graft functional survival and transplantation outcomes as a means to cure Type 1 diabetes. Specifically, they report on the potential for the application of cell‐free cocktails of MSC‐derived products to treat islets before transplantation. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for what promises to be a fascinating read.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

May 6,2018 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Inter‐species MSC Incompatibility, Promoting Hippocampal Neurogenesis, HIF‐1α Stability and Chondrogenesis, and p70S6 Kinase-1 in MSCs!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Inter‐species Incompatibilities Limit Mesenchymal Stem Cell Efficacy

Pro-inflammatory stimuli “license” the immunomodulatory abilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) before they can be employed to treat inflammatory diseases and in transplantation. Interestingly, researchers from the lab of Thomas Ritter (National University of Ireland Galway, Ireland) now report that a rat pro‐inflammatory environment cannot “license” human MSCs, causing a failure of human cells to modulate T‐cell activity in vitro and corneal allograft rejection in vivo. Overall, Lohan et al. highlight the potential for ‘false negative’ results in pre‐clinical experiments utilizing xenogeneic cells. See STEM CELLS now for all the details.

Promoting Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Cognitive Ability of Adult Mice

A new study from the lab of Linyin Feng (University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China) has sought to manipulate neural stem cells (NSCs) and enhance endogenous neurogenesis in the adult. Hui et al. now report that a novel small molecular compound, Yhhu‐3792, expands the NSC pool, promotes adult hippocampal neurogenesis, and elevates the cognitive ability of adult mice. Therefore, the authors suggest that Yhhu‐3792 could represent a novel drug candidate for the treatment of hippocampus associated cognitive dysfunction in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. For more information, see the full paper over at STEM CELLS.

HIF‐1α‐stabilizing agents for MSC Chondrogenesis

Hypoxic regulation controls the chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and so, researchers from the lab of Eileen Gentleman (King's College London, UK) sought to investigate hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilizing compounds as a means to enhance cartilage formation. Taheem et al. demonstrate that the 2‐oxoglutarate analog DMOG induces HIF signaling and an articular chondrocyte‐like expression profile in human BM‐MSC when compared to compounds that reduce Fe2+ bioavailability (CoCl2 or DFX). For all the fine print, head over to STEM CELLS now!

p70S6 Kinase-1 in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

New research from the laboratory of Katsuyuki Takeda (National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado, USA) set out to study the roles of all‐trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in lung tissue regeneration in animal models of emphysema. Interestingly, this new study highlights a role for p70S6K1 signaling pathway activation in lung repair by MSCs and, therefore, upregulation of this pathway in MSCs may provide therapeutic benefits in the treatment of damaged lung tissue such as emphysema. For more details, see STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

May 1,2018 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Cardiomyocyte Maturation, CPCs and ECM, In Vitro effects on Hematopoietic Cells, and AICLI Stem Cell Trial Results!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Cardiomyocyte Maturation requires TLR3 activated NFκB

A new study from the labs of Conrad P. Hodgkinson and Victor J. Dzau (Duke University, Durham, North California, USA) recently set out to understand the processes leading to the production of cardiomyocytes. Hodgkinson et al. discovered that the maturation of committed precursors into mature cardiomyocytes requires the activity of the TLR3‐NFκB pathway. For more details, make your way over to STEM CELLS now!

CPCs and the Extracellular Matrix

A new Perspective article from Clotilde Castaldo (University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy) and Isotta Chimenti (“La Sapienza” University of Rome, Italy) asks us to consider the importance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) when proposing novel regenerative therapies for heart failure. To this end, the authors we discuss multiple issues regarding cardiac progenitor cell-based tissue engineering strategies, and, conversely, about the possible antifibrotic mechanisms induced by cell therapy. For more on this fascinating subject, see STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

In Vitro Biology of Human Hematopoietic Cells

The in vitro expansion of human hematopoietic stem (HSCs) and progenitor (HPCs) cells permits their application in a range of experimental strategies, but at what cost? Researchers from the lab of Hector Mayani (National Medical Center, IMSS, San Pablo Tepetlapa, Coyoacan, Mexico) have now established that in vitro culture promoted significant differences, both in functional and genetic terms, when compared to non-cultured cells. Dircio‐Maldonado et al. discovered that in vitro HSCs displayed a deficient content of long‐term culture‐initiating cells, and a marked differentiation bias toward the myeloid lineage, while both HSCs and HPCs demonstrated a limited expansion potential. For all the fine print, head over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now!

A Five-Year Study of PuCeT for AICLI

A new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study brings us the results of a purified CD34+ cell transplantation (PuCeT) therapy for angiitis‐induced critical limb ischemia (AICLI) patients. The five-year-long trial, carried out by researchers from the lab of Zhihui Dong and Weiguo Fu (Fudan University, Shanghai, China), found long‐term efficacy and durability of autologous transplantation of purified CD34+ cells including achievement of ideal limb salvage, recovery of labor competence, and improved quality of life. Great news!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

April 23,2018 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Stem Cell Radiation Risk, Olfactory Epithelium Progenitor and Stem Cells, MSCs and Heart Disease, and, EpCAM and Colorectal Cancer!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Reviewing Radiation Risk and Stem Cells

The first of this week’s review articles from the lab of Umberto Galderisi (Campania University, Naples, Italy) discusses the effects of low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) on the biology of stem cell compartments. Due to their long life, stem cells may suffer from multiple LDIR insults from medical diagnosis and therapy, air travel, illegal IR waste dumpsites, or by occupational exposures in the nuclear and medical sectors, which can combine to the detriment of stem cell function. For what sounds like a riveting read, head over to STEM CELLS now.

Notch Signaling in Olfactory Epithelium Stem and Progenitor Cells

A new study from the labs of Yiqun Yu and Hongmeng Yu (Fudan University, Shanghai, China) sought to uncover the role of Notch signaling in the regulation of olfactory epithelium (OE) progenitor/stem cells. Employing in vivo lineage tracing, Dai et al. discovered two potential roles for Notch signaling: 1) marking globose basal cells (GBCs) localized in the OE to regulate normal cellular turnover, and 2) marking HBCs to reconstruct OE after injury. For all the intricate details, see STEM CELLS now!

Reviewing Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Heart Disease

This week’s second review article from the lab of Kim A. Connelly (University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada) aims to summarize the known mechanisms that contribute to mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)‐based cardiac regeneration. Ward et al. highlight results from molecular and preclinical studies, discuss clinical trial results to date, describe ongoing investigations, and assess novel approaches for the enhancement of MSC based cardiac regeneration, such as genetic modification. To get yourself up to date, head to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now!

Reviewing the Role of EpCAM in Aggressive Colorectal Cancer

Our final review article, from the labs of Maximilian Boesch (Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Switzerland) and Andreas Seeber (Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria), provides an update on the role of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) in cancer stem cells (CSCs) and the epithelial‐to‐mesenchymal transition (EMT) in colorectal cancer (CRC). Additionally, the authors emphasize the potential predictive selection criteria for novel treatment strategies and refined clinical trial design. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for all the fine print.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!