You are here

Stem Cells Buzz

Comment

Discuss

Highlights of current exciting developments, ranging from research papers to court decisions to industry regulations

April 27, 2017

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Past Buzz

April 23,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – MSC Differentiation and Actin, Cord Blood Trial for Autism, MSCs and Loss of Immunomodulation, and Hypoxic Regulation of Brain CSCs!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Actin Structure and MSC Differentiation

The lab of Buer Sen (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA) want to understand the mechanisms that control the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The team’s most recent paper, published in STEM CELLS, sought to explore the influence of the intranuclear actin cytoskeleton. Sen et al now report that the formation of a branched actin network mediates osteoblast differentiation, while unbranched actin polymers strongly promote adipogenesis. This the paper provides “a fundamentally new paradigm for understanding how stem cells adopt distinct cell fates while also defining a physiological role for the intranuclear actin toolbox”.

Autologous Cord Blood Trial in Young Autism Spectrum Disorder Sufferers

The lab of Jessica M. Sun (Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA) hypothesized that the anti-inflammatory actions of umbilical cord blood-derived cells could alleviate the symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The results of their phase I trial suggest that “it is safe and feasible to perform autologous umbilical cord blood infusions in young children with autism spectrum disorder” and the team has identified “several promising outcome measures for use in future trials”. See all the trials details in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now!

MSC Differentiation Modulates Immunomodulatory Capabilities

Chronically inflamed tissues often lead to the formation of fat deposits, potentially due to aberrant mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation. A new study from the lab of Helen M. McGettrick (University of Birmingham, UK) has now demonstrated that while MSCs can control inflammation, disruption of normal tissue homeostasis can promote MSC differentiation to adipocytes and the loss of immunosuppressive phenotype. See STEM CELLS for all the details.

Hypoxic Regulation of Brain CSCs

Hypoxia can enhance stemness in some cell types and the lab of Tapasya Srivastava (University of Delhi, New Delhi, India) sought to discover how hypoxia affected glioma cancer stem cells (CSCs). Their new study now demonstrates that hypoxia can induce Tet1 and Tet3 demethylases to demethylate Oct4 and Nanog regulatory regions thus contributing to the formation of CSCs in gliomas. See STEM CELLS now for all the oxygen-deprived data!

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

April 19,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – MSC Review, NSC-treatment for PD, Electroacupuncture, and Pulmonary SMCs Origins!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Reviewing how MSC Navigate, Home and Migrate

Systemic administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) forgoes the invasive procedures associated with lesion-proximal transplantation. However, systemically administered MSCs then need to navigate, home, and finally leave the blood flow and migrate through the endothelial barrier to reach the wanted site of action. The lab of Franziska Nitzsche (University of Pittsburgh, USA) has recently penned an excellent article for STEM CELLS, in which they review this area using the leukocyte extravasation process as a role model. Sounds like a great read

NSC-mediated Restoration of PD Induced SVZ Impairment

Neural stem cells (NSCs) represent a promising treatment option for Parkinson's disease (PD), although we do not fully understand the reparative mechanisms at play. However, a new STEM CELLS study from Xinjie Bao, Wei Ge, and Renzhi Wang has recently suggested that, in addition to disruption of the dopaminergic system, PD may also affect the subventricular zone of the brain. Furthermore, NSC transplantation restores this area by stimulating tissue-resident stem cells and not by directly contributing to cell replacement. This reveals an unexpected role of the SVZ in PD progress and treatment and therefore, may provide new therapeutic targets.

Electroacupuncture Releases Mesenchymal Stem Cells

An interesting new study from the labs of Maria B. Grant and Mervin C Yoder (Indiana University School of Medicine, USA) has recently suggested that electroacupuncture stimulates mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) release into peripheral blood through the activation of the nervous system. This new study describes how electroacupuncture could aid tissue repair by increasing the levels of circulating MSCs and boost autologous stem cell therapies by allowing elevated levels of MSCs to be harvested from the blood. See STEM CELLS now for all the electrifying details!

On the Origin of Pulmonary SMCs

Lung development and homeostasis both require the actions of pulmonary smooth muscle cells (SMCs), which are thought to be generated by specific, currently unappreciated, progenitor cells. Now a new study from the labs of Elie El Agha and Saverio Bellusci (Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany) has analyzed the contribution of different progenitor cells to SMC lineage using various reporters. See STEM CELLS now for a detailed look at the study’s intriguing new findings.

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

April 16,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – MSC and Myeloid Progenitors, MSC Vascular Potential, Down syndrome iPSCs from Urine, and Treating Kidney Injury!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

MSCs, MPCs, and Inflammation

While mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent immunomodulatory capabilities, affecting inflammatory myeloid cells such as macrophages and neutrophils, their effects on myeloid progenitor cells (MPCs) remain unknown. Now, a new study from Sunil Chauhan (Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA) demonstrates that MSCs inhibit differentiation of MPCs under inflamed conditions through cell to cell contact mediated by a CD200-CD200R1 interaction, and thereby reduce inflammation. Can we use this information to specifically regulate innate immune responses at the early stages; see STEM CELLS now to find out!

Identifying MSCs with Vascular Regenerative Potential

Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) protects long-lived cells against oxidative stress and the lab of David A. Hess (University of Western Ontario, ON, Canada) hoped that they could use levels of ALDH activity as a marker of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with enhanced regenerative potential. Their new STEM CELLS study now establishes that MSCs selected for high ALDH-activity displayed enhanced pro-angiogenic secretory functions and may be highly utile in vascular regenerative therapies. Cool finding!

Down Syndrome iPSCs Generated from Urine

Modelling Down Syndrome using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represents a promising means to model the disorder caused by trisomy 21 (T21). An exciting study from the lab of Alberto Costa (Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA) has recently described the generation of Down syndrome iPSCs using episomal vectors and epithelial cells isolated from patient urine samples. This generates iPSCs in a non-invasive and effective manner and the authors suggest that their method may be extended to the modelling of other neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders and to cell-based platforms for high-throughput drug screening. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for all the details.

Non-engrafting Kidney-Derived Cells Ameliorate Kidney Injury

CD133+ human kidney cells can ameliorate renal injury following intravenous administration in rodent models of kidney disease and the lab of Bettina Wilm (University of Liverpool, United Kingdom) sought to understand just how they managed this feat in a new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study. Interestingly, Santeramo et al have demonstrated that CD133+ cells do not home to the kidneys and generate specialized renal cells. Instead, the study suggests that paracrine or endocrine factors may induce kidney repair. Identifying the helpful factors could be the next step towards a cell-free renal injury treatment.

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

April 12,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - MSC-Derived Exosomes, Repairing the BBB, MSCs and Multiple system atrophy, and Heart Development with PSCs!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Cell-Free Therapies: Reviewing MSC-Derived Exosomes

Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based treatment strategies currently abound and some focus has shifted to MSC-derived exosomes as a safe and effective cell-free therapeutic option. In response, the labs of Donald G. Phinney and Mark F. Pittenger have sought to review “evidence that MSC-derived microvesicles/exosomes function as paracrine mediators in tissue repair and recapitulate to a large extent the therapeutic effects of parental MSCs.” See STEM CELLS now for a riveting read!

Repairing the BBB with hBMEPCs in Stroke Mice

The impairment of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) represents a major problem related to ischemic stroke, although the labs of Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis and Cesario V. Borlongan (University of South Florida, USA) hope that human bone marrow endothelial progenitor cell (hBMEPC) transplantation may be an exciting therapeutic option. Their new STEM CELLS articles assessed this hypothesis in a rat stroke model and the team now suggest that mitochondrial preservation and augmented pinocytosis following hBMEPC transplant may represent a new neurorestorative mechanism in BBB repair for stroke.

Multiple system atrophy (MSA): Can MSCs Help?

The sporadic neurodegenerative disease multiple system atrophy (MSA) currently suffers from a lack of effective treatments. For this reason, the lab of Phil Hyu Lee (Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea) sought to assess if the neuroprotective activity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may help MSA patients. Now, in a new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study, Kim et al demonstrate that the intra-arterial administration of MSCs is feasible and efficient and leads to an improvement in neuronal viability and behavioral performance in a double toxin-induced MSA model.

 

Perspective: PSCs and Heart Development and Function in Health and Disease

A new perspective article from the lab Hananeh Fonoudi and Alexis Bosman provides us with a brief overview of current and potential uses of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in the investigation of early human heart development in both healthy and diseased states. Furthermore, the duo hopes to provide “guidance and insight into the complexities of establishing pluripotent stem cell models to probe early cardiogenesis and cardiovascular disease.” Get on over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine for a fascinating read!

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

April 9,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Smarca5 and HSCs, UCP2 and Embryonic Neurogenesis, Trialing CD34+ Cells for Cardiomyopathy, and Naming Endothelial Progenitors!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

HSPC Function Requires Smarca5

The conserved chromatin remodeler Smarca5 represents a molecular motor for DNA replication, repair, and transcription. The labs of Tomas Stopka (Charles University, Czech Republic) and Arthur I. Skoultchi (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY, USA) studied the hematopoietic system in response to Smarca5 loss and observed the accumulation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and the inhibition of maturation towards erythroid and myeloid lineages. This all suggests that Smarca5 is required for early hematopoiesis and erythropoiesis; head on over to STEM CELLS to discover all the details.

UCP2-mediated Regulation of Embryonic Neurogenesis

Recent research from the lab of Jian-Wei Jiao (Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China) sought to understand mitochondrial metabolism during embryonic neurogenesis. Their new Stem Cells study now demonstrates that the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) regulates embryonic neurogenesis by inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. This increases the proliferation and decreases the differentiation of progenitors through a mechanism involving the ubiquitination of Yap transcriptional regulator. See all the details in STEM CELLS now!

Trialing CD34+ Cells for Nonischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

The lab of Bojan Vrtovec (Ljubljana University Medical Center, Slovenia) recently reported the results of a trial testing the effects of CD34+ cell transplantation on diastolic parameters in nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy patients (DCM). The results, published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, suggest that “diastolic dysfunction is especially pronounced in patients with more myocardial scarring” and that “cell application appears to be associated with improvement in diastolic parameters”. Great news!

Naming Endothelial Progenitors: A Consensus Statement

Not a review or a research article; instead, the lab of Reinhold J. Medina (Queen's University Belfast, United Kingdom) have penned a consensus statement concerning the naming of endothelial progenitors. An expansion in the field necessitates this statement as “Ensuing confusion around endothelial progenitor cell -identity and function has sometimes diminished confidence in the field”. Medina et al hope that their article will “raise concerns on current standard practices and propose alternative, more accurate, terminology.” For all the fine print, see STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now!

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

April 6,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – RIG1 and Reprogramming, Optimized MSC Spheroids, hAFS Extracellular Vesicles, and Corneal Epithelial Stem Cell mediated Wound Healing!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Efficient Reprogramming Requires RIG1!

Research from the lab of John P. Cooke (Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX, USA) has indicated a critical role for innate immune signaling in nuclear reprogramming to pluripotency. In their new STEM CELLSstudy, Sayed et al describe the importance of the retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 receptor (RIG-1)-like receptor (RLR) pathway during reprogramming employing retroviral or modified messenger RNA (mmRNA) approaches. Could manipulation of this pathway make the production of induced pluripotent stem cells more efficient?

Optimizing the Regenerative Potential of MSC Spheroids

Growing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as three-dimensional “spheroids” augments their pro-regenerative capacities. A new study from the team of J. Kent Leach (University of California, Davis, USA) now describes optimal conditions for spheroid growth that enhances anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic potential. Their multivariate analyses (number of cells/spheroid, oxygen tension, and inflammatory stimulus) could make MSC-based treatments more efficient and effective! See STEM CELLS for all the info.

Characterizing Human Amniotic Fluid Stem Cell Extracellular Vesicles

Human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFS) have shown potential for the treatment of several diseases, mainly through the secretion of pro-regenerative factors. The lab of Sveva Bollini (University of Genova, Italy) has now characterized extracellular vesicles (EV) released by hAFS and demonstrate that EVs contain factors that facilitate significant prosurvival, proliferative, and anti-inflammatory effects. Could hAFS-EVs make up part of a cell-free therapy for a wide range of disorders? See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now to find out!

Boosting Corneal Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells Wound Healing Capabilities

A new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study from the labs of Patrik Danielson and Qingjun Zhou (Umeå University, Sweden) has recently explored the effects of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) on the wound healing capacity of mouse corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells, given the high concentrations found in the corneal epithelium of various species. Encouragingly, this new study demonstrates increased corneal epithelial wound healing following vitamin C treatment, suggesting that this simple additive could greatly enhance corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell therapy.

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

April 3,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Targeting Epithelial CSCs, MAPCs Enhance Recovery from Stroke, Selective MuSC Culture, and Stem Cell Treatment of Arrhythmias!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Targeting Epithelial CSCs: A Review

The ability to selective target cancer stem cells (CSCs) may provide a means to effectively tackle many different types of cancer. A new review article from the lab of Abdolrahman S. Nateri (University of Nottingham, UK) brings together all current thinking on drugs that can target CSCs associated with epithelial cancers. See Stem Cells now for all the pertinent information on an exciting field!

Immune Modulation by MAPCs Enhances Recovery from Stroke

In addition to microenvironmental alterations, stem cell transfusions also generate systemic immune responses. The team of Sean I. Savitz (McGovern Medical School at UT-Health, Houston, Texas, USA) aimed to discover the consequence of this immune modulation during human multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPC) treatment of ischemic stroke. Yang et al discovered that MAPC treatment modified spleen-derived immune responses and thereby promoted a pro-regenerative environment for the brain to recover from stroke. See Stem Cells for all the fine print.

Selective Culture of Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells

In order to be applied as a regenerative treatment for muscle diseases/disorders, pure populations of muscle stem cells (MuSCs) must first be purified from muscle biopsies. To help this regenerative strategy, the lab of Wen-Shu Wu (University of Illinois at Chicago, USA) have devised a simple selective expansion methodology employing a soft three-dimensional salmon fibrin gel culture system. This new simple system forgoes any type of sorting (expensive and often detrimental to the cells) and provides a pure population of cells with great potential for the treatment of muscular disorders. See Stem Cells Translational Medicine for all the details on this new technique.

Transendocardial stem cell injection in ICM: What about Arrhythmias?

A recent Stem Cells Translational Medicine study from the lab of Raul D. Mitrani (University of Miami Hospital, Florida, USA) sought to examine arrhythmic effects from transendocardial injection of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). Through analysis of data from two prospective, randomized controlled trials (POSEIDON and TAC-HFT), Ramireddy et al found no evidence for pro-arrhythmia with MSC implantation but did observe a trend linking MSC transplantation with an improvement of arrhythmias.

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

March 30,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – Efficiently Derived hPSC-ECs, MSC Osteogenesis, Linking HF to Memory, and Immune Recognition of Transplants in the CNS!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

hPSC-ECs – MAPK and PI3K Required!

A recent Stem Cells study from the lab of Ping Zhou (University of California Davis, California, USA) serves us a double hit of stem cell science! Not only do Harding et al provide a great new means of generating highly pure and functional endothelial cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-ECs), but the team also demonstrate the importance of the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways to the entire process. The hope is that this strategy can aid vascular therapy and further delineate the exact mechanisms behind endothelial cell differentiation.

MSCs Osteogenesis Requires RANKL

New findings from the laboratory of Cristina Sobacchi (Humanitas Clinical and Research Institute, Rozzano, Italy) suggest that the RANKL cytokine, which can affect the immune system and control bone regeneration/remodeling, potentiates mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation toward the osteogenic lineage. Their new Stem Cells study employs Rankl-defective MSCs and RANKL-expressing lentiviral vectors and proposes the involvement of an autocrine regulatory loop.

Linking Memory Impairment and Heart Failure (HF)

Is there a link between heart failure (HF) and memory impairment? A new Stem Cells Translational Medicine study from the labs of Seong Who Kim (University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea) and Yunhee Kim Kwon (Kyunghee University, Seoul, Korea) certainly thinks so! Their new findings determined that increased levels of Angiotensin II released after myocardial infarction or in response to pressure and volume overload promote apoptosis of adult hippocampal neural stem cells (HCNs). The authors hope that this study may lead to preventative treatments designed to inhibit memory loss.

Reviewing Cell Transplant Immune Recognition in the CNS

A new review article in Stem Cells Translational Medicine from the lab of Peter Ponsaerts (University of Antwerp, Belgium) aims to review cell transplant immune recognition in the central nervous system (CNS). In this review, Hoornaert et alreview the current knowledge on the immune mechanisms involved in the recognition and rejection of allogeneic and xenogeneic cellular grafts in the CNS” and “propose strategies to reduce graft immunogenicity and to improve graft survival in order to design improved cell-based CNS therapies”. Sounds like a fascinating read!

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

March 27,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – PGE2 and MSC Potency, Perivascular MSC Hierarchy, NAMPT Inhibition and hPSC-CMs, and Engineered iPSC-Derived Endothelial Cells!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

PGE2 Levels Correlate to Potency of MSCs in TBI Treatment

The assessment of specific biomarkers provides a means to indicate the potential success, or failure, of stem cell therapies. In a new study, the lab of Scott D. Olson (University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, USA) has now demonstrated that successful treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) correlated to high levels of COX2 expression and PGE2 secretion. Get over to Stem Cells now to see how these new biomarkers could boost TBI treatment!

Developmental Hierarchy among Perivascular Cells

The perivascular niche of adipose tissue represents the home for a range of multipotent mesenchymal stem-like cells. A recent study from the lab of Bruno Peault (UCLA, Los Angeles, USA) sought to uncover the developmental hierarchy of these cells based on a functional marker of primitivity, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. In Stem Cells, Reef Hardy et al now describe the presence of 4 main types of adipose stem cells (ASCs) and pericytes (PCs) which may lay the groundwork for network-based analyses.

NAMPT inhibition and hPSC Cardiomyocyte Differentiation

Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibition can selectively remove remaining undifferentiated, and potentially tumorigenic, cells from differentiating cultures of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CM). A new study from the lab of Rebekah L. Gundry (Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, USA) now suggests that “cardiomyogenic commitment and continued culturing provides resistance to NAMPT inhibition and cell survival is associated with the ability to maintain cellular ATP pools despite depletion of NAD levels”. Kropp et al hope that their findings can be exploited to refine tumorigenic cell/CM differentiation protocols; see Stem Cells Translational Medicine to find out more.

 

Engineered iPSC-Derived Endothelial Cells and Vascular Injury Response

The lab of Dongqi Xing (University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA) hoped to boost the vascular injury repair potential of endothelial cells (ECs) derived from rat-induced pluripotent stem cells (RiPS) by overexpressing certain interleukin (IL8RA/B) and C-C chemokine (CCR2/5) receptors. Their new Stem Cells Translational Medicine study now indicates that receptor overexpression can improve targeting to injured arteries and decrease injury-induced inflammatory cytokine expression, neutrophil/macrophage infiltration, and neointima formation. Will this novel strategy lead to improved therapeutic interventions for human patients?

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!

March 22,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Reducing Point Mutations, Angiogenesis with Placental MSCs, Hepatic Failure and MSC-EVs, and hNPC-treatment of DLB!

A roundup of some the recent stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells and regenerative medicine

Reducing Point Mutations during Reprogramming

The generation of point mutations during reprogramming may ultimately make induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and their progeny functionally “faulty” and/or potentially dangerous. A new Stem Cells study from the lab of Masumi Abe (National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Chiba, Japan) compared different means of reprogramming and Araki et al now suggest that “it is feasible to reduce the point mutation frequency in induced pluripotent stem cells by optimizing various genome-reprogramming conditions.” Great news!

How Placental MSCs Enhance Angiogenesis

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can promote angiogenesis and have shown potential in treating disorders such as Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD). But just how are they doing it? The answer, in part, comes from a new Stem Cells study from the lab of Shuyang He (Celgene Cellular Therapeutics, Warren, NJ, USA). He et al suggest that human placenta-derived MSC-like cells improve blood flow and promote collateral vessel formation in hind-limb ischemia (HLI) through an immunomodulatory mechanism involving T cell-dependent reprogramming of macrophage differentiation toward M2-like phenotype.

Treating Hepatic Failure with MSC-EVs

One of the many (it seems!) ways that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can boost regeneration is through the release of extracellular vesicles (EV) laden with helpful proteins and RNAs. A new study from the lab of Tushar Patel (Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida, USA) now demonstrates that MSC-EVs can reduce hepatic injury and modulate cytokine expression in a mouse model of hepatic failure. Haga et al also found that the regenerative capacity of MSC-EVS required the highly expressed Y-RNA-1 non-coding RNA. See Stem Cells Translational Medicine now for all the details.

Reducing Symptoms of DLB via hNPC Transplantation

Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with the accumulation of insoluble α-synuclein (α-syn) aggregates. An exciting new study from the laboratory of Mathew Blurton-Jones (University of California, Irvine, USA) has now established that the transplantation of clinically relevant human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) can rescue both cognitive and motor deficits associated with DLB. Get over to Stem Cells Translational Medicine now to read all about this exciting therapeutic strategy.

So that’s a wrap for this week! Please let us know your views on all the stories we have covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz, and please let us know if we have missed anything interesting! Happy reading!