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Embargo Policy: Articles for STEM CELLS and STEM CELLS Translational Medicine are embargoed for release until 9 a.m. Eastern U.S. time on the day the article is posted online. This policy applies to members of the media, authors, institutions' public information officers, and the public. Authors may not discuss their work with the media until 1 week before the mailing date or 1 week before online posting of the article, whichever is earlier, and must ensure that the media representatives agree to abide by the embargo policy. STEM CELLS Translational Medicine may refuse to publish a manuscript, despite acceptance for publication, if it has been prematurely released to the press.

May 15, 2012

The study, led by Dr. Kenji Miki, a cardiovascular surgeon at Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, appears in the May issue of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

Miki's team removed adult stem cells from 30 female mice and genetically modified them to mimic embryonic stem cells. They then used the modified stem cells to grow sheets of healthy heart muscle tissue and implanted them into rats with damaged heart muscle.

The implanted tissue sheets survived for four weeks and the damaged hearts of the rats that received them began to heal, they found.

"The tissue we developed not only survived but improved heart function," Dr. Miki said. "We believe this study could lead to a very real procedure to regenerate the heart."

Implanting the new cells in sheet form appeared to improve their ability to transfer to the damaged host cells, he added.

March 7, 2012

Ischemic heart disease, caused by vessel blockage, is a leading cause of death in many western countries. Studies have shown the potential of stem cells in regenerating heart tissue damaged during an attack. But even as the list of candidate cells for cardiac regeneration has expanded, none has emerged as the obvious choice, possibly because several cell types are needed to regenerate both the heart’s muscles and its vascular components.

Aside from the choice of the right cell source for tissue regeneration, the best way to deliver the stem cells is up for debate, too, as intravenous delivery and injections can be inefficient and possibly harmful. While embryonic stem cells have shown great promise for heart repairs due to their ability to differentiate into virtually any cell type, less than 10 percent of injected cells typically survive the engraftment and of that number generally only 2 percent actually colonize the heart.

March 7, 2012

A fat graft, also called an autologous adipose (fat) tissue transplantation, uses a patient’s own adipose tissue to increase the volume of fat in the subcutaneous area, which functions as the body’s major storage site for fat. The graft promotes three-dimensional reconstruction in patients who have undergone a traumatic or post-surgical event such as a mastectomy, or who suffer from a congenital or chronic debilitative condition.

However, the success of fat graft in clinical use has been limited by a variable but unpredictable low survival rate.

February 15, 2012

“Having a rapid, effective system for generating MSCs is essential for the translation of these stem cell technologies to the clinic. The method reported here, which bypasses the need for harvesting from bone marrow or fat, is a promising solution,” commented Dr. Anthony Atala, director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and editor of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, on the significance of this new study.

Because of their immunosuppressive properties and ability to differentiate into a wide range of mesenchymal-lineage tissues, MSCs show great potential for treating cardiac, renal, neural, joint and bone diseases and injuries as well as inflammatory conditions and hemopoietic co-transplantation.

However, MSCs are typically harvested from adult bone marrow or fat, which not only is painful but also yields low amounts.

February 15, 2012

As both of these cell types are currently in clinical trials, these results are significant because they are the first direct comparison of their therapeutic capability in vivo, the researchers say.

“This research — showing that CSCs can be 30 times more potent than MSCs — is significant because it can impact the design of future clinical trials,” said Dr. Anthony Atala, director of the Wake Forest Institute of Regenerative Medicine and editor of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine. “The results from the study, one of a few to compare efficacy, have the potential to make the translation process more efficient, speeding the development of new effective therapies.”

January 23, 2012

Dr. Meyer-Blazejewska, from the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, in Germany, won the award for her research into Limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD), a condition which causes the cornea to become cloudy and develop a rough surface causing pain and leading to blindness.

Currently, treatments focus on harvesting limbal cells from a patient’s healthy eye or from cadaveric tissue. In her pioneering research, Dr. Meyer-Blazejewska considered the potential use of stem cells harvested from hair follicles to reconstruct damaged tissue for patients who suffer from LSCD in both eyes.

November 10, 2011

"Stem cell differentiation and transplantation has been shown to improve function in conditions including degenerative diseases and blood supply disorders," said Dr Chan. "However, the survival rate of transplanted cells in patients limits their overall effectiveness, which is a barrier to clinical use."

To overcome this issue Dr Chan’s team explored de-differentiation, a process that reverts specialized, differentiated cells back to a more primitive cell. The team focused their research on multipotent stem cells, (MSCs) which can be altered into a variety of cell types through differentiation. Bone marrow MSCs have the potential to differentiate into each of the three basic types of lineage cells which form bone (osteocytes), cartilage (chondrocytes) and fat tissue (adipocytes).

October 28, 2011

“Our research offers the first evidence that the spinal cord meninges, the system of membranes which cover the surface of the brain and the spinal cord, contains stem cells which are capable of self-renewal and proliferation,” said lead authors Dr Ilaria Decimo and Dr Francesco Bifari, at the University of Verona.

Following a spinal injury meningeal cells increase in number and migrate to form glial scars and the team believe this process explains part of the mechanism of stem cell activation in central nervous system diseases; a mechanism which could in turn be used for treatments.

Dr Decimo’s team microdissected samples of spinal cord meninges from adult rats revealing that meningeal cells contain crucial stem cell properties. It is these properties which increase following a spinal cord injury.

April 8, 2011

The potential of stem cells therapies and regenerative medicine is both provocative and unique, offering the distinct possibility of eventually repairing or replacing tissues damaged from disease, including certain cancers. Under the leadership of the esteemed scientist-clinician Anthony Atala, MD as Editor, STEM CELLS Translational Medicine will speed expertly executed translations of emerging lab discoveries into noteworthy clinical trials.

“This exciting new journal will foster the proper growth and ethical development in this fast-moving field. There is a gap in the existing stem cells journal spectrum that STEM CELLS Translational Medicine will fill,” said Dr. Atala. “SCTM is the sister journal to STEM CELLS, the thirty-year-old premier journal in the field, and together they will elevate our science to applications that will impact the lives of many patients.”

February 9, 2011

“One of the challenges in tackling this condition is that the regenerative ability of the human cochlea is severely limited”, said lead author Dr. Sharon Oleskevich from the Hearing Research Group at The University of New South Wales. “It has been proposed that the transplantation of cells from other parts of the body could treat, prevent or even reverse hearing loss. The transplanted cells have the potential to repair tissue by replacing damaged cells and enhancing the survival of existing cells, preventing the condition from developing further.”

To investigate the effects of this treatment, nasal stem cells were injected into the cochlea of mice displaying symptoms of hearing loss. Mice were chosen for this treatment as they display a similar decline in hearing function following infancy.

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