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Embargo Policy: Articles for STEM CELLS and STEM CELLS Translational Medicine are embargoed for release until 9 a.m. Eastern U.S. time on the day the article is posted online. This policy applies to members of the media, authors, institutions' public information officers, and the public. Authors may not discuss their work with the media until 1 week before the mailing date or 1 week before online posting of the article, whichever is earlier, and must ensure that the media representatives agree to abide by the embargo policy. STEM CELLS Translational Medicine may refuse to publish a manuscript, despite acceptance for publication, if it has been prematurely released to the press.

November 3, 2009

Press Release published on 5/10/09

North Carolina, October, 2009 – Scientists from the United States and China have revealed the potential for human stem cells to provide a vaccination against colon cancer, reports a study published in STEM CELLS.

This discovery, led by experts in immunology, Dr. Bei Liu and Dr. Zihai Li, builds upon a century old theory that immunizing with embryonic materials may generate an anti-tumour response. However, this theory has never before been advanced beyond animal research so the discovery that human stem cells are able to immunize against colon cancer is both new and unexpected.

"This finding potentially opens up a new paradigm for cancer vaccine research,” said Dr. Zihai Li. “Cancer and stem cells share many molecular and biological features. By immunizing the host with stem cells, we are able to ‘fool’ the immune system to believe that cancer cells are present and thus to initiate a tumor-combating immune program."

November 3, 2009

Durham, NC, & Craigavon, UK, July 1, 2009 – AlphaMed Press, co-publisher of the journal STEM CELLS®, the first journal in the field of stem cells and regenerative medicine, has promoted Miodrag Stojković to Editor.

Professor Miodrag Stojković is Deputy Director of the Prince Felipe Research Centre and head of its Cellular Reprogramming Laboratory in Valencia, Spain. He led the team that first announced derivation of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESC) from non-viable early human embryos that had stopped their cleavage. First published in STEM CELLS, this technique and stem cells derived with it are now being used to better understand and fight debilitating diseases.

Professor Stojković has long served the Journal, first on its editorial board, then as an associate editor, and most recently as its Co-Editor.

October 5, 2009
Under Strict Embargo until 00.01 (BST) 8th October 2009

 

Media Contact:
Ben Norman
lifesciencenews@wiley.com
+44(0) 1243 770 375

Stem Cells Which “Fool Immune System” May Provide Vaccination for Cancer

 

North Carolina, October, 2009 – Scientists from the United States and China have revealed the potential for human stem cells to provide a vaccination against colon cancer, reports a study published in STEM CELLS.

August 26, 2009

Donald G. Phinney, PhD, is Professor of Immunology and Microbiology and Associate Director for Research at Tulane's Center for Gene Therapy. Professor Phinney investigates the basic biology of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and their potential use for treatment of chronic lung disease and disorders of the central nervous system. Studies in mice have spurred pre-clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intracranial stem cell transplantation for the treatment of neurological sequelae resulting from lysosomal storage diseases.

August 26, 2009
Study Reports Successful Cloning of Human Embryo Using Adult DNA Key Step Toward Developing Embryonic Stem Cell Lines for Therapeutic Cloning

DURHAM, N.C., January 17 - A California research team has become the first to report, and painstakingly document, the cloning of a human embryo using donated oocytes (egg cells) and DNA from the cells of an adult donor. The study was published online today by the journal "Stem Cells."

The experiments, using a technique called somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), provide key steps toward the development of patient-specific embryonic stem cells for use in developing new treatments for conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and spinal cord injury, among others. The lead author was Andrew J. French, Ph.D., of Stemagen Corp., a private company headquartered in La Jolla, Calif.

August 26, 2009
Key Step toward Clinical Testing of Stem Cells Developed from Patients' Skin Cells

DURHAM, N.C., April 30 - Researchers have succeeded in inducing stem cells grown from mouse skin cells to differentiate into functioning cardiovascular and blood cells, according to a study publishing online tomorrow in the journal "Stem Cells."

"Induced Pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are reprogrammed cells obtained by genetic manipulation of normal adult cells that then express capabilities similar to embryonic stem cells," explains Dr. Miodrag Stojković, Co-Editor of "Stem Cells." "That is, iPS cells are theoretically able to differentiate into 220 different cell types. For the first time, scientists from UCLA were able to induce the Differentiation of mouse iPS cells into functional heart cells, smooth muscle cells, and blood cells."

August 26, 2009

JOURNAL “STEM CELLS” PRESENTS 3rd ANNUAL YOUNG INVESTIGATOR AWARD AT INTERNATIONAL STEM CELL SYMPOSIUM

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