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What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Lung Patterning, Injury-induced Transdifferentiation, MSC Pilot Study, and Universal Mutation Correction!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Scientists discover how to switch liver cancer cell growth from 2-D to 3-D structures

Paving the way for testing experimental drugs in more realistic environments, scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have discovered how to make tiny colonies of cells grow in useful new ways inside petri dishes.

Key to unlock blocked differentiation in microRNA-deficient embryonic stem cells

The more than 200 different types of human cells have the same DNA but express different ensembles of genes. Each cell type was derived from embryonic stem cells, which are called pluripotent stem cells because they can differentiate to all those different cell fates.

One very active area of biology is cells that mimic these fountainhead embryonic stem cells, cells that are called induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPSCs. With genetic and biochemical tricks, researchers can reverse a differentiated cell — such as a skin fibroblast — into a pluripotent state.

This is why testicular cancer is so responsive to chemo

Cornell University researchers have taken a major step toward answering a key question in cancer research: Why is testicular cancer so responsive to chemotherapy, even after it metastasizes?

Professional cyclist Lance Armstrong, for example, had testicular cancer that spread to his lung and brain, yet he made a full recovery after conventional chemotherapy.

Scientists reverse diabetes in a mouse model using modified blood stem cells

Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have successfully reversed type 1 diabetes in a mouse model by infusing blood stem cells pre-treated to produce more of a protein called PD-L1, which is deficient in mice (and people) with type 1 diabetes. The cells curbed the autoimmune reaction in cells from both mice and humans and reversed hyperglycemia in diabetic mice.

Investigating patterns of degeneration in Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer’s disease is known to cause memory loss and cognitive decline, but other functions of the brain can remain intact. The reasons cells in some brain regions degenerate while others are protected is largely unknown. Now, researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital have found that factors encoded in the DNA of brain cells contribute to the patterns of degeneration, or vulnerability, in Alzheimer’s disease.

Preventing Transplant Rejection with Endometrial Regenerative Cell-Therapy and SDF-1

A new mouse study demonstrates how intravenous endometrial regenerative cell-treatment could improve tolerance of transplants via the expression of SDF-1

Conditional Knockout ESCs Reveal Cell Survival Role for Gabpa

A new study delineates the role of the tumor-related transcription factor Gabpa in the pluripotency network of mouse embryonic stem cells

What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Compounding Factors, Muscle Stem Cells, Hemogenic Endothelium, and Endothelial Progenitor Cells!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Study uses stem cells to explore the causes of autism

Using human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to model autism spectrum disorder (ASD), researchers at the University of São Paulo, Brazil, and University of California, San Diego, have revealed for the first time that abnormalities in the supporting cells of the brain, called astrocytes, may contribute to the cause of the disorder. The findings help explain what happens at a biological level to produce ASD behavior, and may help researchers identify new treatments for patients with the disorder.

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