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New insight into how a somatic past shapes the future of human iPSCs

From Nature Cell Biology
Paper commentary by Carla Mellough

The differences between human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and their somatically derived counterparts, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), have been under close scrutiny following the accumulation of various reports indicating greater disparity between the two cell types than originally envisaged (for example see iPSC don’t forget their origins). Conflicting results have been reported and remain unresolved, for example the transcriptional signature of iPSCs, although ascribed to partial memory retention of their somatic origin, does not always correlate with the differences in gene expression between iPSCs and hESCs. This has led to some of the biases being attributed to interlaboratory methodological variation. Functional disparity between differentiating hESCs and iPSCs has also been reported, with iPSC derivatives showing limited differentiation potential and early senescence and perhaps indicating that iPSCs do not hold a comparable clinical value to hESCs. This, alongside numerous reports highlighting the remarkable similarity of both cell types has resulted in some confusion regarding the applicability of iPSCs to translational research. For this reason, elucidation of the true likeness between iPSCs and hESCs has been somewhat limited. A recent study published in Nature Cell Biology from various centres at the University of California by Ohi et al.attempts to address these limitations by systematically comparing human iPSC lines derived from multiple somatic cells types and under the same methodology, in parallel.

New insight into how a somatic past shapes the future of human iPSCs

From Nature Cell Biology
Paper commentary by Carla Mellough

The differences between human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and their somatically derived counterparts, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), have been under close scrutiny following the accumulation of various reports indicating greater disparity between the two cell types than originally envisaged (for example see iPSC don’t forget their origins). Conflicting results have been reported and remain unresolved, for example the transcriptional signature of iPSCs, although ascribed to partial memory retention of their somatic origin, does not always correlate with the differences in gene expression between iPSCs and hESCs. This has led to some of the biases being attributed to interlaboratory methodological variation. Functional disparity between differentiating hESCs and iPSCs has also been reported, with iPSC derivatives showing limited differentiation potential and early senescence and perhaps indicating that iPSCs do not hold a comparable clinical value to hESCs. This, alongside numerous reports highlighting the remarkable similarity of both cell types has resulted in some confusion regarding the applicability of iPSCs to translational research. For this reason, elucidation of the true likeness between iPSCs and hESCs has been somewhat limited. A recent study published in Nature Cell Biology from various centres at the University of California by Ohi et al.attempts to address these limitations by systematically comparing human iPSC lines derived from multiple somatic cells types and under the same methodology, in parallel.

NASA and stem cells

NASA’s space shuttle program came to an end last week after 135 flights over 30 years. Some might argue that the shuttle programme (total cost estimated at $200 billion) did not deliver the expected outcomes for space exploration but we cannot deny that some very useful technologies and scientific knowledge have arisen from this extended experiment in re-usable orbiting hardware. A description of this list is beyond the scope of the portal but one fascinating experiment made its way into space aboard the last flight of the shuttle Atlantis at the end of July. The shuttle delivered adipose stem cells from six adults to the International Space Station where they will take part in an ongoing NASA research programme aimed at greater understanding the impact of the harsh radiation environment of space on cellular ageing.

NASA and stem cells

NASA’s space shuttle program came to an end last week after 135 flights over 30 years. Some might argue that the shuttle programme (total cost estimated at $200 billion) did not deliver the expected outcomes for space exploration but we cannot deny that some very useful technologies and scientific knowledge have arisen from this extended experiment in re-usable orbiting hardware. A description of this list is beyond the scope of the portal but one fascinating experiment made its way into space aboard the last flight of the shuttle Atlantis at the end of July. The shuttle delivered adipose stem cells from six adults to the International Space Station where they will take part in an ongoing NASA research programme aimed at greater understanding the impact of the harsh radiation environment of space on cellular ageing.

NASA

NASA’s space shuttle program came to an end last week after 135 flights over 30 years. Some might argue that the shuttle programme (total cost estimated at $200 billion) did not deliver the expected outcomes for space exploration but we cannot deny that some very useful technologies and scientific knowledge have arisen from this extended experiment in re-usable orbiting hardware. A description of this list is beyond the scope of the portal but one fascinating experiment made its way into space aboard the last flight of the shuttle Atlantis at the end of July. The shuttle delivered adipose stem cells from six adults to the International Space Station where they will take part in an ongoing NASA research programme aimed at greater understanding the impact of the harsh radiation environment of space on cellular ageing.

NASA

NASA’s space shuttle program came to an end last week after 135 flights over 30 years. Some might argue that the shuttle programme (total cost estimated at $200 billion) did not deliver the expected outcomes for space exploration but we cannot deny that some very useful technologies and scientific knowledge have arisen from this extended experiment in re-usable orbiting hardware. A description of this list is beyond the scope of the portal but one fascinating experiment made its way into space aboard the last flight of the shuttle Atlantis at the end of July. The shuttle delivered adipose stem cells from six adults to the International Space Station where they will take part in an ongoing NASA research programme aimed at greater understanding the impact of the harsh radiation environment of space on cellular ageing.

There Will be Blood: Isolation of Single Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells Capable of Long-Term Multilineage Engraftment

From Science
By Stuart P. Atkinson

A recent Stem Cells article (Woods et al) and associated review on the Stem Cells Portal described an optimized in vitro differentiation protocol for the generation of precursors of the hematopoietic lineage and primitive hematopoietic cells from human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The authors themselves note however that this protocol failed to derive long-term repopulating haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This suggests either that the protocol is incomplete, maybe lacking certain key signals at necessary time-points, and/or that the cell surface markers used were insufficient to purify those cells capable of long-term repopulation and engraftment. In a recent paper in Science, researchers from the laboratory of John E. Dick at the Toronto Medical Discovery Tower, Toronto, Canada have identified key cell surface markers which now allow the purification of HSCs with long-term engraftment and serial transplantation ability and importantly, single-cell engraftment; the definitive assessment of HSC potential (Notta et al, 2011).

There Will be Blood: Isolation of Single Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells Capable of Long-Term Multilineage Engraftment

From Science
By Stuart P. Atkinson

A recent Stem Cells article (Woods et al) and associated review on the Stem Cells Portal described an optimized in vitro differentiation protocol for the generation of precursors of the hematopoietic lineage and primitive hematopoietic cells from human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The authors themselves note however that this protocol failed to derive long-term repopulating haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This suggests either that the protocol is incomplete, maybe lacking certain key signals at necessary time-points, and/or that the cell surface markers used were insufficient to purify those cells capable of long-term repopulation and engraftment. In a recent paper in Science, researchers from the laboratory of John E. Dick at the Toronto Medical Discovery Tower, Toronto, Canada have identified key cell surface markers which now allow the purification of HSCs with long-term engraftment and serial transplantation ability and importantly, single-cell engraftment; the definitive assessment of HSC potential (Notta et al, 2011).

Mission

 

Mission

Stem Cells Translational Medicine is dedicated to significantly advancing the clinical utilization of stem cell molecular and cellular biology. By bridging stem cell research and clinical trials, Stem Cells Translational Medicine will help move applications of these critical investigations closer to accepted best practices.

Stem Cells Translational Medicine will publish high-impact, peer-reviewed articles.  In addition to original manuscripts, case studies, and commentaries this unique journal will encourage researchers to submit data from their negative clinical trials for publication to rapidly share results that others could find valuable to their applications.

“This exciting new journal will foster the proper growth and ethical development in this fast-moving field. There is a gap in the existing stem cells journal spectrum that Stem Cells Translational Medicine will fill,” said Dr. Atala.  “Stem Cells Translational Medicine is the sister journal to Stem Cells and together they will elevate the science to applications that will help the lives of many people.”

Stem Cells Translational Medicine is a monthly publication that will be available beginning December 2011.

CIRM’s Support
The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) is providing a three-year seed grant in support of the publication of Stem Cells Translational Medicine.

Call For Papers

The potential of stem cells therapies and regenerative medicine is both provocative and powerful, offering the distinct possibility of eventually repairing or replacing tissues damaged from disease, including certain cancers.  By helping speed expert translations of emerging lab discoveries into legitimate clinical trials and bedside application, Stem Cells Translational Medicine ultimately will improve patient outcomes.

Stem Cells Translational Medicine welcomes original articles and concise reviews describing the clinically relevant translational aspects of stem cells and progenitor cells for cell based therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine from the bench to patient care. The Journal covers all clinical translational aspects of stem cells.  The following sections include, but are not limited to, the topics listed:

 

Embryonic Stem Cells/Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cells

  • Derivation, characterization and differentiation for clinical use
  • Cell banking
  • Therapeutic potential
  • Animal models
  • Translational pre-clinical studies
  • Clinical applications
  • First in human case studies
  • Phase I/II clinical trials
  • Negative clinical results

Fetal and Neonatal Stem Cells

  • Derivation, characterization and differentiation for clinical use
  • Cell banking
  • Therapeutic potential
  • Animal models
  • Translational pre-clinical studies
  • Clinical applications
  • First in human case studies
  • Phase I/II clinical trials
  • Negative clinical results

Tissue-Specific progenitor and Stem Cells

  • Derivation, characterization and differentiation for clinical use
  • Cell banking
  • Therapeutic potential
  • Animal models
  • Translational pre-clinical studies
  • Clinical applications
  • First in human case studies
  • Phase I/II clinical trials
  • Negative clinical results

Cell based drug development, screening and toxicology

  • Derivation, characterization and differentiation
  • In-vivo models
  • In-vitro models
  • Throughput systems

Enabling technologies for cell based clinical translation

  • Cell tracking
  • Cell delivery vehicles
  • Biomaterials
  • Devices
  • Imaging
  • Diagnostics

Cancer Stem Cells

  • Characterization
  • Therapeutic targets
  • Animal models
  • Translational pre-clinical studies
  • Clinical applications
  • First in human case studies
  • Phase I/II clinical trials
  • Negative clinical results

Standards, Policies, and Regulations for cell based therapies

  • Cell standards
  • Intellectual property relevant to clinical translation
  • Cell toxicology/ tumorigenesis and other assays
  • Regulations for manufacturing
  • Regulations for clinical trials

Protocols and manufacturing for cell based therapies

  • GMP aspects
  • Cell based processing/expansion
  • Cell based potency/storage
  • Quality assurance/control
  • Scale-up and production
  • Cell based therapies release criteria

Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

  • Applications for cell-based strategies in pathological conditions
  • Tissue engineering
  • Medical device and artificial organ development
  • Cell transplantation and technologies that will maintain, improve or restore the function of diseased organs
  • Therapeutic potential
  • Animal models
  • Translational pre-clinical studies
  • Clinical applications
  • First in human case studies
  • Phase I/II clinical trials
  • Negative clinical results

Download "Call for Papers" PDF

Submit your manuscripts at
http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/stemcellstm

Send pre-submission inquiries to
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