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Recent Article from STEM CELLS Express Generates Significant News Coverage

Reprogrammed Mouse Fibroblasts Differentiate into Cells of the Cardiovascular and Hematopoietic Lineages

Katja Schenke-Layland, Katrin E. Rhodes, Ekaterini Angelis, Yekaterina Butylkova, Sepideh Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Christos Gekas, Rui Zhang, Joshua I. Goldhaber, Hanna K. Mikkola, Kathrin Plath, W. Robb Maclellan
Stem Cells Express, first published online May 1, 2008; doi:10.1634/stemcells.2008-0033

Young Investigator Award (April 21, 2008)

Durham, North Carolina, USA and Seoul, Korea. April 22, 2008 – AlphaMed Press, publisher of the peer-reviewed journal STEM CELLS, announces that the annual STEM CELLS Young Investigator Award, with co-sponsorship from the International Stem Cell Symposium, will be presented on June 20, 2008 in Seoul, Korea. The US$10,000 award will be presented to a young scientist who, as principal author, published a paper in STEM CELLS during the past year that was judged to be most important by the Journal’s editorial board jury. The awardee will also be invited to present a paper at the 6th International Stem Cell Symposium with support provided by the conference organizers.

Young Investigator Award 2008 (April 28, 2008)

Monday, April 28, 2008 - National "Stem Cell" Award to Be Given in Symposium Awardee to Be Named at 6th Int'l Stem Cell Symposium

AlphaMed Press, publisher of the peer-reviewed journal STEM CELLS, announces that the annual STEM CELLS Young Investigator Award, with co-sponsorship from the International Stem Cell Symposium, will be presented on June 20, 2008 in Seoul, Korea.

AlphaMed Press - Exhibits and Conference Calendar

 

Exhibits and Conference Calendar

 

AlphaMed Press will be exhibiting at the following conferences in 2008:

 

Please stop by for complimentary issues and great giveaways and discuss with us possible ways we may partner.

 

 

 

 

 

6th ISSCR Annual Meeting -
International Society for Stem Cell Research
June 11-14, 2008
Philadelphia, PA
Booth 701

 

ONS 33rd Annual Congress -
Oncology Nursing Society
May 15-18, 2008
Philadelphia, PA
Booth 332

 

50th ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition -
American Society of Hematology
December 6-9, 2008
San Francisco, CA

 

44th ASCO Annual Meeting -
American Society of Clinical Oncology
May 30- June 1, 2008
Chicago, IL
Booth 3091

 

 

50th ASTRO Annual Meeting -
American Society for Therapeutic Radiology
and Oncology
September 21-25, 2008
Boston, MA
Booth 2414

 

 

 

31st Annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
December 10-14, 2008
San Antonio, TX

 

Pictures from 2008 Symposium

Dr. Lena Motoda

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Conference Site - The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul

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Conference Entrance
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Setting up STEM CELLS Booth

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Dr. Ann Murphy at STEM CELLS Booth
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STEM CELLS Group at Booth
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2008 Winner - Lena Motoda

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JOURNAL STEM CELLS® PRESENTS 3rd ANNUAL YOUNG INVESTIGATOR AWARD
AT
INTERNATIONAL STEM CELL SYMPOSIUM

Dr. Motoda named for fundamental cancer stem cell discovery


Seoul, Korea - June 20, 2008

Durham, NC & Seoul, Korea, June 20, 2008 - The journal STEM CELLS® announces that Lena Motoda, MD, PhD won the 3rd Annual STEM CELLS® Young Investigator Award. Co-sponsored by The International Stem Cell Symposium, the $10,000 prize is annually given to a young scientist who is the principal author of a research paper published in STEM CELLS judged to be most important by a worldwide jury. A medical graduate of The University of Tokyo, Dr. Motoda received her PhD degree for her Young Investigator Award winning research conducted at the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, National University of Singapore, with the mentorship of Associate Professor Motomi Osato and Professor Yoshiaki Ito.  Dr. Motoda is currently in the Department of Pediatrics, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo.

 

STEM CELLS published Dr. Motoda's landmark paper that describes the importance of "RUNX1" as a molecular guardian of stem cells that produce blood cells. RUNX1, a transcription factor protein, protects these vital cells from cancer-inducing molecular insults by maintaining fail-safe cellular mechanisms.  This may offer new therapeutic options for blood cell malignancies like leukemia and lymphoma.

The article is freely available online: AbstractReferences |  Full Text: HTML, PDF (3022K).

 

Professor Miodrag Stojković, co-editor of STEM CELLS, remarked that, "Dr. Motoda's discovery demonstrates, once again, why it is essential to understand basic molecular mechanisms since these revelations may both help prevent disease and enable the development of novel and hopefully more effective therapeutic options." To which Professor Donald Phinney, STEM CELLS' other co-editor, remarked, "The manuscript by Motoda and her colleagues is an excellent example of how molecular mechanisms that regulate stem cell self-renewal, cell proliferation, and cell death are inextricably linked and how the perturbation of these pathways can cooperate to promote malignancies."

The 3rd annual award, presented on June 20th during the 6th Annual International Stem Cell Symposium, in Seoul, Korea, is considered one of the most important in this fast paced research arena. "The journal STEM CELLS is the oldest and most respected journal devoted to stem cell research and regenerative medicine.  The International Stem Cell Symposium, now in its sixth year, is pleased to partner with this world-class journal," said Professor Il-Hoan Oh, Director of The Catholic University of Korea's Cell & Gene Therapy Institute and chair of the Symposium's organizing committee.

Pictures From The 2008 International Stem Cell Symposium

2008 Follow-Up Interview with Dr. Sahara

1.  How has your research progressed since winning the Young Investigator Award in 2006?

After winning the Young Investigator Award (YIA) in 2006, I investigated the association between bone marrow-derived (vascular progenitor) cells and pulmonary vascular bed under pulmonary hypertension, and I have confirmed that unlike systemic vascular bed, bone marrow-derived cells little participate in pulmonary arterial remodeling under pulmonary hypertension (Circulation. 2007). Now, I try to identify and characterize vascular progenitor cells, which participate in systemic vascular diseases.


2.  How has winning the Young Investigator Award in 2006 affected your career?

I assumed an assistant professor of the department of cardiovascular medicine at University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine in 2008/4. I guess that winning the YIA has helped me in my career.


3.  What are your plans for the future?

I am going to pursue basic and clinical cardiovascular medicine. Particularly, I am interested in the roles of tissue stem cells and/or vascular progenitor cells in several cardiovascular diseases.


4.  What do you feel is one of the most exciting areas of stem cell research today?

What I feel is one of the most exciting areas of stem cell research is paradigm shift in defining vascular endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Yoder MC et al have demonstrated that the cells defined as EPCs in the commonly-used “EPC culture assay” are actually mostly myeloid cells and that newly-identified endothelial colony-forming cells are rare circulating EPCs with proliferative potential and vessel forming activity in vivo (Blood. 2007).


5.  What advice would you give to other young investigators in the field today?

I would like to advise other young investigators the following: First, once you start it, you should do it to the last. Secondly, you should do several studies at the same time rather than only one study. 

2008 Winner - Dr. Akimov

1.  How has your research progressed since winning the Young Investigator Award in 2006?

During the last two years, my research was focused on projects related to safety of blood transfusion and cell therapy. As I described in my first interview after winning the Young Investigator Award in 2006, we are working with various in vivo and in vitro models to develop efficient tests for the presence of abnormal prion protein in donor blood and blood products. Prions play a crucial role in pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies—fatal neurodegenerative disorders such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy, also known as “mad cow” disease. I was able to successfully apply my experience in the stem cell field to the current projects.  Particularly, we have generated several cell models based on immortalized mouse mesenchymal stem cells, which could be used to develop new tests for prion infection and to screen potential anti-prion drugs. Initial results of the study will be published soon.

2.  How has winning the Young Investigator Award in 2006 affected your career?

I attained a Scientist I position in the Transmissible Diseases Department of the American Red Cross Holland Laboratory right before winning the Young Investigator Award. I believe that the Award will help me further advance my scientific career. 

3.  What are your plans for the future?

I plan to continue working on various aspects of blood transfusion and cell therapy safety, especially on development of appropriate cell models. I hope my future work will be closely related to stem cell research.  

4.  What do you feel is one of the most exciting areas of stem cell research today?

Amazing results have been achieved in such areas of stem cell research as development of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology, including human iPS cells; tissue engineering using three-dimensional functional tissues based on inhabiting synthetic scaffolds with progenitor cells followed by cell multiplication and differentiation. Introducing new, improved materials for scaffolds and new elegant techniques like “printing cells” promises to accelerate progress in regenerative medicine. It is important to bring stem cell research closer to the needs of practical medicine.  I believe that the most exciting progress will be achieved through using multidisciplinary approaches. Development of reliable techniques will be critical for further progress in stem cell therapy, in particular: safe methods of genetic modification of stem/progenitor cells for gene therapy and iPS cell technology, and modification of current protocols for mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to exclude the possibility of transmitting any prion or viral disease. Fast development of cell therapy and regenerative medicine requires paying proper attention to safety concerns.

 

5.  What advice would you give to other young investigators in the field today?

I wish them to believe in their dreams and to be persistent. 

Do you have any other comments?

I would like to express my gratitude to the Editorial Board of STEM CELLS and Invitrogen Corporation for establishing of this award and to my former colleagues from Dr. Hawley’s group who helped me a lot with the study that allowed me to win the Young Investigator Award.

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