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Know which way to miRoam: Red means ‘GO’, Green ‘STOP’!

Know which way to miRoam: Red means ‘GO’, Green ‘STOP’!

By Carla B. Mellough

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are shown to have many of the characteristics of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) including prolonged proliferative capacity and differentiation across all germ layers. The therapeutic potential of human iPSC (hiPSC), however, remains controversial. Whilst the use of hiPSC would overcome some of the ethical issues surrounding hESC, their suitability and usefulness as a replacement cell type has recently fallen into question. For example, concerns have been raised over the retention of epigenetic memory from the iPSC cell of origin (see iPSC don’t forget their origins) which questions their level of reprogramming, and may be the cause of their apparently biased pluripotent potential. However, conversely, it has been suggested that in fact iPSC and hESC are very similar (see Similar Human iPSC and ESC Chromatin States Suggests Usefulness in Regenerative Medicine). Various hiPSC clones differ with regards to their level of reprogramming and differentiation potential and being able to identify those of greatest potential therapeutic value would no doubt help the advancement of hiPSC research.

Know which way to miRoam: Red means ‘GO’, Green ‘STOP’!

Know which way to miRoam: Red means ‘GO’, Green ‘STOP’!

By Carla B. Mellough

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are shown to have many of the characteristics of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) including prolonged proliferative capacity and differentiation across all germ layers. The therapeutic potential of human iPSC (hiPSC), however, remains controversial. Whilst the use of hiPSC would overcome some of the ethical issues surrounding hESC, their suitability and usefulness as a replacement cell type has recently fallen into question. For example, concerns have been raised over the retention of epigenetic memory from the iPSC cell of origin (see iPSC don’t forget their origins) which questions their level of reprogramming, and may be the cause of their apparently biased pluripotent potential. However, conversely, it has been suggested that in fact iPSC and hESC are very similar (see Similar Human iPSC and ESC Chromatin States Suggests Usefulness in Regenerative Medicine). Various hiPSC clones differ with regards to their level of reprogramming and differentiation potential and being able to identify those of greatest potential therapeutic value would no doubt help the advancement of hiPSC research.

September issue of Stem Cells

By Lyle Armstrong

The September issue of Stem Cells has some articles of particular interest to the field of regenerative medicine using adult or tissue specific stem cells.  We have selected two reviews for this editorial.

 

Bioengineering Our Way towards Organ Replacement Therapy

By Maria H. Ledran

In the mid 1930’s the unlikely collaborators aviator Charles Lindberg and maverick surgeon Alexis Carrel, were the first to sustain whole organs outside the body for extended periods using their newly invented glass perfusion pumps. Arguably the unique methods set out by the pair including the anastomy (suturing) of even the most miniscule blood vessels and, importantly, the proof of concept for organ perfusion with a vision towards regeneration and transplant, have facilitated the intense research into regenerative medicine that continues to this day. Seventy five years later, and with an increasing shortage of suitable donor organs, we are still unable to generate whole organs in vitro. However, new tissue engineering approaches might now represent an important step towards closing this gap.

Bioengineering Our Way towards Organ Replacement Therapy

By Maria H. Ledran

In the mid 1930’s the unlikely collaborators aviator Charles Lindberg and maverick surgeon Alexis Carrel, were the first to sustain whole organs outside the body for extended periods using their newly invented glass perfusion pumps. Arguably the unique methods set out by the pair including the anastomy (suturing) of even the most miniscule blood vessels and, importantly, the proof of concept for organ perfusion with a vision towards regeneration and transplant, have facilitated the intense research into regenerative medicine that continues to this day. Seventy five years later, and with an increasing shortage of suitable donor organs, we are still unable to generate whole organs in vitro. However, new tissue engineering approaches might now represent an important step towards closing this gap.

STEM CELLS’ Position Statement on hESC Research

STEM CELLS’ Position Statement on hESC Research

Durham, North Carolina, August 27, 2010 — The Journal STEM CELLS® has published many important and exciting achievements in the field of stem cells during its twenty-eight year history. Through scientific discovery, the Journal reports on both adult and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The Journal believes that the scientific community benefits from research on all stem cell types in order to maximize our basic biological knowledge and our ability to fight debilitating human diseases. Therefore, we applauded the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July when it approved the first authorized clinical trials using hESCs to treat spinal cord injury.  This decision encouraged researchers, clinicians, and patients alike.

STEM CELLS’ Position Statement on hESC Research

STEM CELLS’ Position Statement on hESC Research

Durham, North Carolina, August 27, 2010 — The Journal STEM CELLS® has published many important and exciting achievements in the field of stem cells during its twenty-eight year history. Through scientific discovery, the Journal reports on both adult and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The Journal believes that the scientific community benefits from research on all stem cell types in order to maximize our basic biological knowledge and our ability to fight debilitating human diseases. Therefore, we applauded the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July when it approved the first authorized clinical trials using hESCs to treat spinal cord injury.  This decision encouraged researchers, clinicians, and patients alike.

SC NIH

Durham, North Carolina, August 27, 2010 — The Journal STEM CELLS® has published many important and exciting achievements in the field of stem cells during its twenty-eight year history. Through scientific discovery, the Journal reports on both adult and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The Journal believes that the scientific community benefits from research on all stem cell types in order to maximize our basic biological knowledge and our ability to fight debilitating human diseases. Therefore, we applauded the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July when it approved the first authorized clinical trials using hESCs to treat spinal cord injury.  This decision encouraged researchers, clinicians, and patients alike.

SC NIH

Durham, North Carolina, August 27, 2010 — The Journal STEM CELLS® has published many important and exciting achievements in the field of stem cells during its twenty-eight year history. Through scientific discovery, the Journal reports on both adult and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The Journal believes that the scientific community benefits from research on all stem cell types in order to maximize our basic biological knowledge and our ability to fight debilitating human diseases. Therefore, we applauded the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July when it approved the first authorized clinical trials using hESCs to treat spinal cord injury.  This decision encouraged researchers, clinicians, and patients alike.

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