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Neurons derived from super-obese people respond differently to appetite hormones

U.S. scientists have successfully generated hypothalamic-like neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) taken from the blood and skin cells of super-obese individuals and people with a normal body weight. The researchers found that the brain cells derived from the super obese were more likely to dysregulate hormones related to feeding behavior and hunger, as well as obesity-related genes and metabolic pathways.

Endangered salamander offers clues on healing spinal cord injury

One of the most vexing problems with spinal cord injuries is that the human body does not rebuild nerves once they have been damaged. Other animals, on the other hand, seem to have no problem repairing broken neurons.

A new study takes a comparative approach to pinpoint what happens differently in humans versus other animals to explain why they can successfully regenerate neurons while we instead form scar tissue. By learning from the similarities and differences, researchers hope to find new leads in the treatment of spinal cord injury.

Study showing frog embryos can fully regrow eyes after injury could someday benefit humans

A University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) scientist and her team have found that frog embryos can fully regrow their eyes after injuries, a breakthrough that may lead one day to the ability to orchestrate tissue regeneration in humans.

The study by UNLV scientist Kelly Tseng, Ph.D., was recently published in the journal Experimental Eye Research.

What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Stem Cell Radiation Risk, Olfactory Epithelium Progenitor and Stem Cells, MSCs and Heart Disease, and, EpCAM and Colorectal Cancer!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Placenta-derived Decidua Stromal Cells: A New and Improved Means to Treat GVHD?

Researchers demonstrate that placenta-derived decidua stromal cell treatment may represent an effective means to battle graft-versus-host disease

AKT-mTOR Signaling: The Key to Enhanced Tendon Differentiation of MSCs?

New research suggests that potentiating the AKT-mTOR signaling axis can boost tenogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells and improve current tendon repair strategies

What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - HSC Radiation Sensitivity, Combined ALS Treatment, Bipotent Megakaryocytic‐Erythroid Progenitors, and Targeting CD133+ Cells!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Index measures similarity between cancer cells and pluripotent stem cells

The theory that cancer progression involves the acquisition by tumor cells of features similar to those of stem cells has gained strength in the scientific community. According to this theory, tumor cells tend to "forget" the tissue from which they originated as the disease progresses, acquiring an undifferentiated phenotype associated with heightened aggressiveness and treatment resistance.

Researchers gain new insights into blood cell formation

Every day, stem cells in our bone marrow produce billions of new red blood cells. Any disruption in this process can result in serious disease. Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmediz in Berlin and Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Massachusetts, have succeeded in furthering our understanding of how blood cells are formed.

Their insights into the molecular foundations of this process may help break new ground in the treatment of certain types of anemia. The results of this study have been published in Cell.

What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Prostate Progenitor Cell Activity, Healing by iPSC-Derived MSCs, MINDY1 and ESC Self‐Renewal, and Stem Cell Therapy for Corneal Scarring!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

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