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Recently Published

Summaries of the most recent articles published in STEM CELLS and STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

December 10, 2019

Thyroid hormones are regarded as the significant controllers of metabolic rate and oxygen consumption in mammals; however, we know little about their effects in the earliest stages of human development.

December 10, 2019

Recent basic and translational research has highlighted the promise of tissue‐specific stem cells from the skeleton or skeletal stem cells (SSCs). While they have been shown to contribute to skeletal development and regeneration, we still lack a full understanding of how these cells react during inflammatory bone disease.

December 10, 2019

Previous research from the lab of Atul Malhotra (Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia) reported on the immediate safety and neonat

December 10, 2019

Current differentiation methods for generating human induced pluripotent stem cell‐derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC‐CMs) yield heterogeneous populations - a fact that represents a critical barrier for downstream applications that require well‐defined populations. Furthermore, we lack markers that identify undesired populations such as teratoma‐forming or arrhythmia‐inducing cells.

December 5, 2019

Clinical trials employing cultured human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM‐MSCs) have demonstrated the presence of significant inter‐donor variability in biological functions and clinical efficacy.

December 5, 2019

Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in extremely premature neonates, and, unfortunately, current therapies for BPD are limited.

December 5, 2019

Three‐dimensional biofabrication using photo‐cross-linkable hydrogel bioscaffolds may revolutionize the need for transplants and implants in joints, with articular cartilage being an early target tissue.

December 5, 2019

Markers for cub cells, airways stem cells that can self‐renew and differentiate into other cells, and the signaling pathways involved in their stem cell activities remain poorly understood.

Past Buzz

December 10,2019 SSCS Suppress Inflammatory Osteoclastogenesis

Recent basic and translational research has highlighted the promise of tissue‐specific stem cells from the skeleton or skeletal stem cells (SSCs). While they have been shown to contribute to skeletal development and regeneration, we still lack a full understanding of how these cells react during inflammatory bone disease. Now, new research led by Heng Zhu (Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine), Ning Mao (Beijing Institute of Basic Medical Sciences), and Li Ding (Air Force Medical Center, Beijing, China) indicates that a population of murine long‐bone‐derived SSCs can induce the expression of osteoprotegerin, intercellular adhesion molecule‐1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule‐1 under an inflammatory microenvironment and suppress inflammatory osteoclast formation and bone resorption in vivo and in vitro. Overall, this new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study indicates the possibility of using SSCs to alleviate bone loss in diseases.

December 10,2019 Long-term Outcomes of hAECS for BPD

Previous research from the lab of Atul Malhotra (Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia) reported on the immediate safety and neonatal outcomes of six premature infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) administered human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs). In STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, the team provides long‐term safety and follow‐up outcomes; they report no evidence of tumor formation and no long‐term adverse events attributed to hAEC administration.

December 10,2019 Identifying Stem Cell-derived Cardiomyocytes

Current differentiation methods for generating human induced pluripotent stem cell‐derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC‐CMs) yield heterogeneous populations - a fact that represents a critical barrier for downstream applications that require well‐defined populations. Furthermore, we lack markers that identify undesired populations such as teratoma‐forming or arrhythmia‐inducing cells. In their new STEM CELLS article, researchers led by James W. Chan (University of California, Davis, USA) establish a direct correlation between cardiac subtype and the intensity of second harmonic generation (SHG) signals generated from myosin filaments. Furthermore, Chang et al. show how SHG signals represent a label‐free marker for eliminating undesired cell populations in a fascinating new study.

December 5,2019 Predicting BM-MSC Functions Using Imaging

Clinical trials employing cultured human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM‐MSCs) have demonstrated the presence of significant inter‐donor variability in biological functions and clinical efficacy. For this reason, researchers led by Moustapha Kassem (Odense University, Denmark) applied a high‐content imaging methodology to cultured BM‐MSCs obtained from a large cohort of donors to identify morphological features, including cell area and nucleus geometry, as predictors for cell differentiation and proliferation. Kowal et al. hope that said parameters could serve as selection criteria for BM‐MSC populations to be used in clinical trials of enhancing bone regeneration. For more, see STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now!

December 5,2019 Intranasal Delivery of MSCs for BPD

Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in extremely premature neonates, and, unfortunately, current therapies for BPD are limited. Preclinical studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) treatment can restore alveolar growth, enhance vascular development, and stimulate tissue repair; however, most of these studies administer MSCs via the intravenous/tracheal route. For the first time, researchers from the lab of Alvaro Moreira (University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, USA) show that the intranasal delivery of MSCs for BPD is effective in restoring lung alveolar growth and vascular development. Importantly, this new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article provides evidence that this non-invasive approach may be employed separately or as an adjunct/alternative to other routes.

December 5,2019 Toxicity in Cartilage Biofabrication

Three‐dimensional biofabrication using photo‐cross-linkable hydrogel bioscaffolds may revolutionize the need for transplants and implants in joints, with articular cartilage being an early target tissue. Several barriers must be overcome to successfully translate these approaches to clinical practice; in particular, the photo‐crosslinking process may impact cell viability and DNA integrity, and consequently chondrogenic differentiation. In a new review article from STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, researchers from the lab of Serena Duchi (University of Melbourne, VIC, Australia) explore the specific sources of cellular cytotoxicity and genotoxicity inherent to the photo‐crosslinking reaction, the methods to analyze cell death, cell metabolism, and DNA damage within the bioscaffolds, and the possible strategies to overcome these detrimental effects.

December 5,2019 BMP Signaling and Club Cell Regeneration

Markers for cub cells, airways stem cells that can self‐renew and differentiate into other cells, and the signaling pathways involved in their stem cell activities remain poorly understood. However, a new STEM CELLS article from the lab of Huijuan Liu (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China) has reported, for the first time, the essential nature of the BMPR1A-mediated Tak1‐p38MAPK pathway for club cell regeneration and the repair of the bronchiolar epithelium. Furthermore, Shafiquzzaman et al. identify Prrx1 as a marker for club cells in the adult mouse lung.

December 2,2019 Piezo1 Channel Activation Drives MSC Migration

While mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) release ATP as an extracellular signaling molecule in response to mechanical and diverse other stimuli, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. However, findings reported in STEM CELLS from the laboratory of  Lin‐Hua Jiang (University of Leeds, UK) now describe how the Ca2+‐permeable Piezo1 channel, a newly‐discovered mechanosensing mechanism, regulates the migration of human dental pulp‐derived MSCs by inducing ATP release and subsequent activation of P2 receptor purinergic signaling. Mousawi et al. provide novel insights into the mechanisms regulating MSC migration in the hope that an increased understanding of MSC migration may improve the application of MSCs in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

December 2,2019 NCAM Regulates Chondrocyte Hypertrophy

Osteoarthritis (OA) patients suffer from irreversible and challenging to repair defects in the cartilage; however, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based cartilage regeneration may represent an exciting approach if we can inhibit the excessive chondrocyte hypertrophy observed in the inflammatory intra‐articular conditions of OA. Now, researchers led by Bin‐Feng Cheng and Zhi‐Wei Feng (Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, Henan, China) provide evidence in a new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article that neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) deficiency enhances chondrocyte hypertrophy in chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs and experimental OA, and upregulation of NCAM inhibits hypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation. Are NCAM‐overexpressing MSCs the key to OA treatment?

December 2,2019 MSC-induced Immunosuppression in Asthma

In a new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article, researchers from the laboratory of Patricia Rieken Macedo Rocco (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) demonstrated that while a single dose of therapeutically administered mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) failed to ameliorate lung remodeling in house dust mite‐induced allergic asthma, multiple doses of MSCs effectively reduced both lung inflammation and remodeling and improved lung mechanics. However, Castro et al. also note that multiple doses of MSCs resulted in immunosuppressive effects, which should be considered during the development of future clinical trials in patients with severe asthma.